Here’s why MK Gandhi valued individual liberty; delight in beliefs as ascertained on May 2016. Study on it. USA.

 

Nobility Denied Not??

 

Why all civil revolutions have been non-violent. Satyagraha as standards of the rule of values. Values as ascertained from the Rabbinate of Yerushalayim.

 

 

True art takes note not merely of form but also of what lies behind. MK Gandhi. The artistry that moral beauty brings to all brides not. Vera Wang.

charkha

Ask not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country. Government Exam 2. Perrenials not.

Motivational-Poster

https://quizlet.com/12805075/government-exam-2-flash-cards/

 

Roshan Kumari, Kathak. Movie, Jalshaghar or the Music room.

The evangelization of evil–Satyagraha and emancipation. The passion of God.

 

 

 

 

 

Vanity of Vanities, Ecclesiastes and Robert Fuller Murray, American Poet, 19th Century.

SolomonkingrehoboamWhen Solomon, king of Israel, saw, by the spirit of prophecy, that the kingdom of Rehoboam his son would be divided with Jeroboam, the son of Nebat; and that Jerusalem, and the house of the sanctuary, would be destroyed, and the people of the children of Israel would be carried captive; he said, by his word, Vanity of vanities in this world, vanity of vanities; all that I and my father David have laboured for, all is vanity!” Ecclesiastes. Be ye happy, if ye may, In the years that pass away. Ye shall pass and be forgot, And your place shall know you not. Other generations rise, With the same hope in their eyes, That in yours is kindled now, And the same light on their brow. They shall see the selfsame sun That your eyes now gaze upon, They shall breathe the same sweet air, And shall reck not who ye were. Yet they too shall fade at last In the twilight of the past, They and you alike shall be Lost from the world’s memory. Then, while yet ye breathe and live, Drink the cup that life can give. Be ye happy, if ye may, In the years that pass away, Ere the golden bowl be broken, Ere ye pass and leave no token, Ere the silver cord be loosed, Ere ye turn again to dust. And shall this be all,’ ye cry, `But to eat and drink and die? If no more than this there be, Vanity of vanity!’ Yea, all things are vanity, And what else but vain are ye? Ye who boast yourselves the kings Over all created things. Kings! whence came your right to reign? Ye shall be dethroned again. Yet for this, your one brief hour, Wield your mockery of power. Dupes of Fate, that treads you down Wear awhile your tinsel crown Be ye happy, if ye may, In the years that pass away.

  The 14th Dalai Lama’s Acceptance Speech, on the occasion of the award of the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, December 10, 1989.

A universal call for disarmament
I am very happy to be here with you today to receive the Nobel Prize for Peace. I feel honored, humbled and deeply moved that you should give this important prize to a simple monk from Tibet. I am no one special. But, I believe the prize is a recognition of the true values of altruism, love, compassion and nonviolence which I try to practice, in accordance with the teachings of the Buddha and the great sages of India and Tibet.  I accept it as a tribute to the man who founded the modern tradition of nonviolent action for change – Mahatma Gandhi – whose life taught and inspired me. And, of course, I accept it on behalf of the six million Tibetan people, my brave countrymen and women inside Tibet, who have suffered and continue to suffer so much. They confront a calculated and systematic strategy aimed at the destruction of their national and cultural identities. The prize reaffirms our conviction that with truth, courage and determination as our weapons, Tibet will be liberated. I speak to inform you of the sad situation in my country today and of the aspirations of my people, because in our struggle for freedom, truth is the only weapon we possess. War today would be a form of suicide.