Here’s why MK Gandhi valued individual liberty; delight in beliefs as ascertained on May 2016. Study on it. USA.

 

Nobility Denied Not??

 

Why all civil revolutions have been non-violent. Satyagraha as standards of the rule of values. Values as ascertained from the Rabbinate of Yerushalayim.

 

 

Ask not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country. Government Exam 2. Perrenials not.

Motivational-Poster

https://quizlet.com/12805075/government-exam-2-flash-cards/

 

The Gospel of Bread Labor — Jerusalem, Also considered to be Beloved of God. Our “saware.”

Jerusalem19thcenturydivinelawDivine Law  GOD created man to work for his food, and said that those who ate without work were thieves. Ahimsa is nothing if not a well-balanced exquisite consideration for one’s neighbor and an idle man is wanting in that elementary consideration. ‘In the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat thy bread’ , says the Bible whose understanding of the moral is being rational human beings. Good laws under a free government determined sovereignty in their practice of spirit of truth versus the spirit of error. The spirit of truth in democratic governments, including the one of the Almighty, our creator and the Blessed One in Jerusalem. Epistle-sort of, from Yerushalayim, Israel. Ancient and new.

https://books.google.com/books?id=YQVQw3DCuosC&pg=PA101&lpg=PA101&dq=the+schism+between+reason+and+rationality&source=bl&ots=xF-OjUvvD9&sig=Fgoh7TNxPJoLwDCKKMZo6M57BgU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiascT0v5jTAhVLySYKHb_-D4QQ6AEIIjAA#v=onepage&q=the%20schism%20between%20reason%20and%20rationality&f=false.

CS Lewis and the conspiracy of Empire. A most reluctant convert; Individual liberty in an age of deceit and revolution.

Individual liberty as peaceful pursuits of innocent people

Throughout his work, Lewis infused an interconnected worldview that championed objective truth, moral ethics, natural law, literary excellence, reason, science, individual liberty, personal responsibility and virtue, and Christian theism. In so doing, he critiqued naturalism, reductionism, nihilism, positivism, scientism, historicism, collectivism, atheism, statism, coercive egalitarianism, militarism, welfarism, and dehumanization and tyranny of all forms. Unlike “progressive” crusaders for predatory government power over the peaceful pursuits of innocent people, Lewis noted that “I do not like the pretensions of Government—the grounds on which it demands my obedience—to be pitched too high. I don’t like the medicine-man’s magical pretensions nor the Bourbon’s Divine Right. This is not solely because I disbelieve in magic and in Bossuet’s Politique. I believe in God, but I detest theocracy. For every Government consists of mere men and is, strictly viewed, a makeshift; if it adds to its commands ‘Thus saith the Lord,’ it lies, and lies dangerously.”

Lewis addressed not only the evils of totalitarianism as manifested in fascism and communism, but the more subtle forms that face us on a daily basis, including the welfare, therapeutic, nanny, and scientistic states. “Of all tyrannies,” he stated, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth. This very kindness stings with intolerable insult. To be “cured” against one’s will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals. Throughout his books, he defended the rights and sanctity of individuals against tyranny not just because he opposed evil, but because he considered a life in freedom—including both social and economic freedom—to be essential: “I believe a man is happier, and happy in a richer way, if he had “the freeborn mind.” But I doubt whether he can have this without economic independence, which the new society is abolishing. For economic independence allows an education not controlled by Government; and in adult life it is the man who needs, and asks, nothing of Government who can criticize its acts and snap his fingers at its ideology.”

https://fpatheatre.com/production/the-most-reluctant-convert/

 

 

 

Roshan Kumari, Kathak. Movie, Jalshaghar or the Music room.

  The 14th Dalai Lama’s Acceptance Speech, on the occasion of the award of the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, December 10, 1989.

A universal call for disarmament
I am very happy to be here with you today to receive the Nobel Prize for Peace. I feel honored, humbled and deeply moved that you should give this important prize to a simple monk from Tibet. I am no one special. But, I believe the prize is a recognition of the true values of altruism, love, compassion and nonviolence which I try to practice, in accordance with the teachings of the Buddha and the great sages of India and Tibet.  I accept it as a tribute to the man who founded the modern tradition of nonviolent action for change – Mahatma Gandhi – whose life taught and inspired me. And, of course, I accept it on behalf of the six million Tibetan people, my brave countrymen and women inside Tibet, who have suffered and continue to suffer so much. They confront a calculated and systematic strategy aimed at the destruction of their national and cultural identities. The prize reaffirms our conviction that with truth, courage and determination as our weapons, Tibet will be liberated. I speak to inform you of the sad situation in my country today and of the aspirations of my people, because in our struggle for freedom, truth is the only weapon we possess. War today would be a form of suicide.