T.S. Eliot (1888–1965).  Prufrock and Other Observations. 1920.

 
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.
 
  S’io credesse che mia risposta fosse, If I thought that that I was replying
  A persona che mai tornasse al mondo, To someone who would ever return to the world
  Questa fiamma staria senza piu scosse, This flame would cease to flicker
  Ma perciocche giammai di questo fondo, But since from these depths
  Non torno vivo alcun, s’i’odo il vero, No one ever returns alive, if what I’ve heard is true 
  Senza tema d’infamia ti rispondo. I will answer you without fear of infamy. 
 
LET us go then, you and I,
When the evening is spread out against the sky
Like a patient etherized upon a table;
Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
The muttering retreats         5
Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels
And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:
Streets that follow like a tedious argument
Of insidious intent
To lead you to an overwhelming question….         10
Oh, do not ask, “What is it?”
Let us go and make our visit.
 
In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo.
 
The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes,         15
The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes
Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening,
Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains,
Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys,
Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap,         20
And seeing that it was a soft October night,
Curled once about the house, and fell asleep.
 
And indeed there will be time
For the yellow smoke that slides along the street,
Rubbing its back upon the window panes;         25
There will be time, there will be time
To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet;
There will be time to murder and create,
And time for all the works and days of hands
That lift and drop a question on your plate;         30
Time for you and time for me,
And time yet for a hundred indecisions,
And for a hundred visions and revisions,
Before the taking of a toast and tea.
 
In the room the women come and go         35
Talking of Michelangelo.
 
And indeed there will be time
To wonder, “Do I dare?” and, “Do I dare?”
Time to turn back and descend the stair,
With a bald spot in the middle of my hair—         40
(They will say: “How his hair is growing thin!”)
My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin,
My necktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple pin—
(They will say: “But how his arms and legs are thin!”)
Do I dare         45
Disturb the universe?
In a minute there is time
For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.
 
For I have known them all already, known them all:
Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons,         50
I have measured out my life with coffee spoons;
I know the voices dying with a dying fall
Beneath the music from a farther room.
  So how should I presume?
 
And I have known the eyes already, known them all—         55
The eyes that fix you in a formulated phrase,
And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin,
When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall,
Then how should I begin
To spit out all the butt-ends of my days and ways?         60
  And how should I presume?
 
And I have known the arms already, known them all—
Arms that are braceleted and white and bare
(But in the lamplight, downed with light brown hair!)
Is it perfume from a dress         65
That makes me so digress?
Arms that lie along a table, or wrap about a shawl.
  And should I then presume?
  And how should I begin?

.      .      .      .      .      .      .      .
Shall I say, I have gone at dusk through narrow streets         70
And watched the smoke that rises from the pipes
Of lonely men in shirt-sleeves, leaning out of windows?…
 
I should have been a pair of ragged claws
Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.

.      .      .      .      .      .      .      .
And the afternoon, the evening, sleeps so peacefully!         75
Smoothed by long fingers,
Asleep … tired … or it malingers,
Stretched on the floor, here beside you and me.
Should I, after tea and cakes and ices,
Have the strength to force the moment to its crisis?         80
But though I have wept and fasted, wept and prayed,
Though I have seen my head (grown slightly bald) brought in upon a platter,
I am no prophet—and here’s no great matter;
I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker,
And I have seen the eternal Footman hold my coat, and snicker,         85
And in short, I was afraid.
 
And would it have been worth it, after all,
After the cups, the marmalade, the tea,
Among the porcelain, among some talk of you and me,
Would it have been worth while,         90
To have bitten off the matter with a smile,
To have squeezed the universe into a ball
To roll it toward some overwhelming question,
To say: “I am Lazarus, come from the dead,
Come back to tell you all, I shall tell you all”—         95
If one, settling a pillow by her head,
  Should say: “That is not what I meant at all;
  That is not it, at all.”
 
And would it have been worth it, after all,
Would it have been worth while,         100
After the sunsets and the dooryards and the sprinkled streets,
After the novels, after the teacups, after the skirts that trail along the floor—
And this, and so much more?—
It is impossible to say just what I mean!
But as if a magic lantern threw the nerves in patterns on a screen:         105
Would it have been worth while
If one, settling a pillow or throwing off a shawl,
And turning toward the window, should say:
  “That is not it at all,
  That is not what I meant, at all.”

.      .      .      .      .      .      .      .
        110
No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;
Am an attendant lord, one that will do
To swell a progress, start a scene or two,
Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool,
Deferential, glad to be of use,         115
Politic, cautious, and meticulous;
Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse;
At times, indeed, almost ridiculous—
Almost, at times, the Fool.
 
I grow old … I grow old …         120
I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled.
 
Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?
I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach.
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each.
 
I do not think that they will sing to me.         125
 
I have seen them riding seaward on the waves
Combing the white hair of the waves blown back
When the wind blows the water white and black.
 
We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown         130
Till human voices wake us, and we drown

On the expansiveness of experience, “moral law.” Immanuel Kant. http://www.philosophypages.com/hy/5i.htm.

kant

When Kant speaks about the moral law, he is essentially referring to that sense of obligation to which our will often responds. We all know the experience — we are sometimes pulled in a certain direction, not because we desire to act in that way, but in spite of our desire to act in the opposite way.

This pull is toward that moral sense which Kant believes each of us has, in virtue of being rational and free. It is conscience. Actually, it is deeper than conscience, because our conscience can be mistaken. Conscience arises because of certain structure of human consciousness — it is the structure of human reason and human will.

The Moral Order

Having mastered epistemology and metaphysics, Kant believed that a rigorous application of the same methods of reasoning would yield an equal success in dealing with the problems of moral philosophy. Thus, in the Kritik der practischen Vernunft (Critique of Practical Reason) (1788), he proposed a “Table of the Categories of Freedom in Relation to the Concepts of Good and Evil,” using the familiar logical distinctions as the basis for a catalog of synthetic a priori judgments that have bearing on the evaluation of human action, and declared that only two things inspire genuine awe: “der bestirnte Himmel über mir und das moralische Gesetz in mir” (“the starry sky above and the moral law within”). Kant used ordinary moral notions as the foundation ffor a derivation of this moral law in his Grundlegung zur Metaphysik der Sitten (Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals) (1785).

From Good Will to Universal Law

We begin with the concept of that which can be conceived to be good without qualification, a good will. Other good features of human nature and the benefits of a good life, Kant pointed out, have value only under appropriate conditions, since they may be used either for good or for evil. But a good will is intrinsically good; its value is wholly self-contained and utterly independent of its external relations. Since our practical reason is better suited to the development and guidance of a good will than to the achievement of happiness, it follows that the value of a good will does not depend even on the results it manages to produce as the consequences of human action.

Kant’s moral theory is, therefore, deontological: actions are morally right in virtue of their motives, which must derive more from duty than from inclination. The clearest examples of morally right action are precisely those in which an individual agent’s determination to act in accordance with duty overcomes her evident self-interest and obvious desire to do otherwise. But in such a case, Kant argues, the moral value of the action can only reside in a formal principle or “maxim,” the general commitment to act in this way because it is one’s duty. So he concludes that “Duty is the necessity to act out of reverence for the law.”

According to Kant, then, the ultimate principle of morality must be a moral law conceived so abstractly that it is capable of guiding us to the right action in application to every possible set of circumstances. So the only relevant feature of the moral law is its generality, the fact that it has the formal property of universalizability, by virtue of which it can be applied at all times to every moral agent. From this chain of reasoning about our ordinary moral concepts, Kant derived as a preliminary statement of moral obligation the notion that right actions are those that practical reason would will as universal law.

The sacred warrior. The liberator of South Africa looks at the seminal work of the liberator of India, MK Gandhi. By Nelson Mandela. (Our greatest Satyagrahi.) CNN:December 27, 1999.

MandelaIndia is Gandhi’s country of birth; South Africa his country of adoption. He was both an Indian and a South African citizen. Both countries contributed to his intellectual and moral genius, and he shaped the liberatory movements in both colonial theaters.  He is the archetypal anticolonial revolutionary. His strategy of noncooperation, his assertion that we can be dominated only if we cooperate with our dominators, and his nonviolent resistance inspired anticolonial and antiracist movements internationally in our century. Both Gandhi and I suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respective peoples against governments that violated our freedoms.

The Gandhian influence dominated freedom struggles on the African continent right up to the 1960s because of the power it generated and the unity it forged among the apparently powerless. Nonviolence was the official stance of all major African coalitions, and the South African A.N.C. remained implacably opposed to violence for most of its existence.  Gandhi remained committed to nonviolence; I followed the Gandhian strategy for as long as I could, but then there came a point in our struggle when the brute force of the oppressor could no longer be countered through passive resistance alone. We founded Unkhonto we Sizwe and added a military dimension to our struggle. Even then, we chose sabotage because it did not involve the loss of life, and it offered the best hope for future race relations. Militant action became part of the African agenda officially supported by the Organization of African Unity (O.A.U.) following my address to the Pan-African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa (PAFMECA) in 1962, in which I stated, “Force is the only language the imperialists can hear, and no country became free without some sort of violence.”

Gandhi himself never ruled out violence absolutely and unreservedly. He conceded the necessity of arms in certain situations. He said, “Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor …” Violence and nonviolence are not mutually exclusive; it is the predominance of the one or the other that labels a struggle.

Gandhi arrived in South Africa in 1893 at the age of 23. Within a week he collided head on with racism. His immediate response was to flee the country that so degraded people of color, but then his inner resilience overpowered him with a sense of mission, and he stayed to redeem the dignity of the racially exploited, to pave the way for the liberation of the colonized the world over and to develop a blueprint for a new social order.  He left 21 years later, a near maha atma (great soul). There is no doubt in my mind that by the time he was violently removed from our world, he had transited into that state.

No ordinary leader–divinely inspired.

He was no ordinary leader. There are those who believe he was divinely inspired, and it is difficult not to believe with them. He dared to exhort nonviolence in a time when the violence of Hiroshima and Nagasaki had exploded on us; he exhorted morality when science, technology and the capitalist order had made it redundant; he replaced self-interest with group interest without minimizing the importance of self. In fact, the interdependence of the social and the personal is at the heart of his philosophy. He seeks the simultaneous and interactive development of the moral person and the moral society.

His philosophy of Satyagraha is both a personal and a social struggle to realize the Truth, which he identifies as God, the Absolute Morality. He seeks this Truth, not in isolation, self-centeredly, but with the people. He said, “I want to find God, and because I want to find God, I have to find God along with other people. I don’t believe I can find God alone. If I did, I would be running to the Himalayas to find God in some cave there. But since I believe that nobody can find God alone, I have to work with people. I have to take them with me. Alone I can’t come to Him.” He sacerises his revolution, balancing the religious and the secular.

Awakening

His awakening came on the hilly terrain of the so-called Bambata Rebellion, where as a passionate British patriot, he led his Indian stretcher-bearer corps to serve the Empire, but British brutality against the Zulus roused his soul against violence as nothing had done before. He determined, on that battlefield, to wrest himself of all material attachments and devote himself completely and totally to eliminating violence and serving humanity. The sight of wounded and whipped Zulus, mercilessly abandoned by their British persecutors, so appalled him that he turned full circle from his admiration for all things British to celebrating the indigenous and ethnic. He resuscitated the culture of the colonized and the fullness of Indian resistance against the British; he revived Indian handicrafts and made these into an economic weapon against the colonizer in his call for swadeshi–the use of one’s own and the boycott of the oppressor’s products, which deprive the people of their skills and their capital.

A great measure of world poverty today and African poverty in particular is due to the continuing dependence on foreign markets for manufactured goods, which undermines domestic production and dams up domestic skills, apart from piling up unmanageable foreign debts. Gandhi’s insistence on self-sufficiency is a basic economic principle that, if followed today, could contribute significantly to alleviating Third World poverty and stimulating development.

Gandhi predated Frantz Fanon and the black-consciousness movements in South Africa and the U.S. by more than a half-century and inspired the resurgence of the indigenous intellect, spirit and industry. Gandhi rejects the Adam Smith notion of human nature as motivated by self-interest and brute needs and returns us to our spiritual dimension with its impulses for nonviolence, justice and equality.

He exposes the fallacy of the claim that everyone can be rich and successful provided they work hard. He points to the millions who work themselves to the bone and still remain hungry. He preaches the gospel of leveling down, of emulating the kisan (peasant), not the zamindar (landlord), for “all can be kisans, but only a few zamindars.”  He stepped down from his comfortable life to join the masses on their level to seek equality with them. “I can’t hope to bring about economic equality… I have to reduce myself to the level of the poorest of the poor.”

From his understanding of wealth and poverty came his understanding of labor and capital, which led him to the solution of trusteeship based on the belief that there is no private ownership of capital; it is given in trust for redistribution and equalization. Similarly, while recognizing differential aptitudes and talents, he holds that these are gifts from God to be used for the collective good.  He seeks an economic order, alternative to the capitalist and communist, and finds this in sarvodaya based on nonviolence (ahimsa).

He rejects Darwin’s survival of the fittest, Adam Smith’s laissez-faire and Karl Marx’s thesis of a natural antagonism between capital and labor, and focuses on the interdependence between the two. He believes in the human capacity to change and wages Satyagraha against the oppressor, not to destroy him but to transform him, that he cease his oppression and join the oppressed in the pursuit of Truth.  We in South Africa brought about our new democracy relatively peacefully on the foundations of such thinking, regardless of whether we were directly influenced by Gandhi or not.

We in South Africa brought about our new democracy relatively peacefully on the foundations of such thinking, regardless of whether we were directly influenced by Gandhi or not. Gandhi remains today the only complete critique of advanced industrial society. Others have criticized its totalitarianism but not its productive apparatus. He is not against science and technology, but he places priority on the right to work and opposes mechanization to the extent that it usurps this right. Large-scale machinery, he holds, concentrates wealth in the hands of one man who tyrannizes the rest. He favors the small machine; he seeks to keep the individual in control of his tools, to maintain an interdependent love relation between the two, as a cricketer with his bat or Krishna with his flute. Above all, he seeks to liberate the individual from his alienation to the machine and restore morality to the productive process.

As we find ourselves in jobless economies, societies in which small minorities consume while the masses starve, we find ourselves forced to rethink the rationale of our current globalization and to ponder the Gandhian alternative.  At a time when Freud was liberating sex, Gandhi was reining it in; when Marx was pitting worker against capitalist, Gandhi was reconciling them; when the dominant European thought had dropped God and soul out of the social reckoning, he was centralizing society in God and soul; at a time when the colonized had ceased to think and control, he dared to think and control; and when the ideologies of the colonized had virtually disappeared, he revived them and empowered them with a potency that liberated and redeemed.

The Theogony of Hesiod, translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White [1914] http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/hesiod/theogony.htm

hopeofhesiodFrom the Heliconian Muses let us begin to sing, who hold the great and holy mount of Helicon, and dance on soft feet about the deep-blue spring and the altar of the almighty son of Cronos, and, when they have washed their tender bodies in Permessus or in the Horse’s Spring or Olmeius, make their fair, lovely dances upon highest Helicon and move with vigorous feet. Thence they arise and go abroad by night, veiled in thick mist, and utter their song with lovely voice, praising Zeus the aegis- holder and queenly Hera of Argos who walks on golden sandals and the daughter of Zeus the aegis-holder bright-eyed Athene, and Phoebus Apollo, and Artemis who delights in arrows, and Poseidon the earth-holder who shakes the earth, and reverend Themis and quick-glancing Aphrodite, and Hebe with the crown of gold, and fair Dione, Leto, Iapetus, and Cronos the crafty counsellor, Eos and great Helius and bright Selene, Earth too, and great Oceanus, and dark Night, and the holy race of all the other deathless ones that are for ever. And one day they taught Hesiod glorious song while he was shepherding his lambs under holy Helicon, and this word first the goddesses said to me — the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus who holds the aegis:

Μουσάων Ἑλικωνιάδων ἀρχώμεθ᾽ ἀείδειν,αἵ θ᾽ Ἑλικῶνος ἔχουσιν ὄρος μέγα τε ζάθεόν τε καί τε περὶ

κρήνην ἰοειδέα πόσσ᾽ ἁπαλοῖσιν ὀρχεῦνται καὶ βωμὸν ἐρισθενέος Κρονίωνος·καί τε λοεσσάμεναι τέρενα

χρόα Περμησσοῖο ἢ Ἵππου κρήνης ἢ Ὀλμειοῦ ζαθέοιο ἀκροτάτῳ Ἑλικῶνι χοροὺς ἐνεποιήσαντο καλούς,

ἱμερόεντας· ἐπερρώσαντο δὲ ποσσίν.Ἔνθεν  ἀπορνύμεναι, κεκαλυμμέναι ἠέρι πολλῇ,ἐννύχιαι στεῖχον

περικαλλέα ὄσσαν ἱεῖσαι,ὑμνεῦσαι Δία τ᾽ αἰγίοχον καὶ πότνιαν Ἥρην Ἀργεΐην, χρυσέοισι πεδίλοις

ἐμβεβαυῖαν,κούρην τ᾽  αἰγιόχοιο Διὸς γλαυκῶπιν Ἀθήνην Φοῖβόν τ᾽ Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ Ἄρτεμιν ἰοχέαιραν ἠδὲ

Ποσειδάωνα γαιήοχον, ἐννοσίγαιον, καὶ Θέμιν αἰδοίην ἑλικοβλέφαρόν τ᾽ Ἀφροδίτην Ἥβην τε

ρυσοστέφανον καλήν τε Διώνην Λητώ τ᾽ Ἰαπετόν τε ἰδὲ Κρόνον ἀγκυλομήτην Λητώ τ᾽ Ἰαπετόν τε ἰδὲ

Κρόνον ἀγκυλομήτην Ἠῶ τ᾽ Ἠέλιόν τε μέγαν λαμπράν τε Σελήνην Γαῖάν τ᾽ Ὠκεανόν τε  μέγαν καὶ Νύκτα

μέλαιναν ἄλλων τ᾽ ἀθανάτων ἱερὸν γένος αἰὲν ἐόντων. Αἵ νύ ποθ᾽ Ἡσίοδον  καλὴν ἐδίδαξαν ἀοιδήν, ἄρνας

ποιμαίνονθ᾽ Ἑλικῶνος ὕπο ζαθέοιο. Τόνδε δέ με ρώτιστα θεαὶ πρὸς μῦθον ἔειπον, Μοῦσαι Ὀλυμπιάδες,

κοῦραι Διὸς αἰγιόχοιο.

“Shepherds of the wilderness, wretched things of shame, mere bellies, we know how to speak many false

things as though they were true; but we  know, when we will, to utter true things.”

«Ποιμένες ἄγραυλοι, κάκ᾽ ἐλέγχεα, γαστέρες οἶον, ἴδμεν ψεύδεα πολλὰ λέγειν ἐτύμοισιν ὁμοῖα, ἴδμεν δ᾽,

εὖτ᾽ ἐθέλωμεν, ἀληθέα γηρύσασθαι.»Ὥς ἔφασαν κοῦραι μεγάλου Διὸς  ἀρτιέπειαι·  Ὥς ἔφασαν κοῦραι

μεγάλου Διὸς ἀρτιέπειαι· καί μοι σκῆπτρον ἔδον δάφνης ἐριθηλέος ὄζον

Why God and Morality no longer follow. A humanistic understanding of moral law. Gandhi and his sovereign law, fiction? We didn’t think so.

sovereigntyofgodBecause we share common passions, the role of moral education need not limit, itself to focusing on useful and practical rules of conduct. It is enabled to turn itself additionally to the development of helpful emotions. For example, compassion is fostered and developed through educational programs where students have opportunities to experience what it’s like to be, say, paralyzed, blind, or deaf. A good part of compassion seems to be the ability to identify with those who suffer — so this ability, if developed further, can enable society to produce a generation of young people who are more respectful of the rights of others, more helpful in situations calling for altruistic behavior, and more just in their dealings with people in general. Situation Ethics:Since the process of improving ethics IS a trial-and-error one, then it is reasonable to keep ethical principles flexible. After all, if a given principle is rigid and absolutistic, it tends to foster a kind of idolatry where people worship the rule instead of its intent. Since good and evil are ultimately judged from human need and interest, then it only makes sense for all moral principles to work toward meeting human needs and serving human interests — as opposed to becoming ends in themselves. Believing, on the other hand, that moral values come from God has inspired many
throughout history to practice idolatry with moral principles. When we realize that right and wrong cannot exist without beings with needs, and that human beings have proven themselves capable of devising and then abiding by their own rules, then there is no longer any way to deny that the pursuit of human interest, for the individual and for society, for the short and for the long run, is the broad goal of laws and ethics. Further, this does not really need an explanation or justification, except to those who have lost sight of the actual basis for their own values. That is, no one needs to be asked why he or she pursues his or her own interests, and no planet of people needs to be asked why it seeks to pursue common goals. Only when people try to depart from this most automatic of pursuits, only when someone posits a law higher than what is good for humanity, need any questions be raised — for it is only THEN that an explanation or justification of a moral base is necessary.

http://americanhumanist.org/humanism/The_Human_Basis_of_Laws_and_Ethics

The Body Of Christ. O Lord You Know Me and You Search Me, Psalm 139. The Bible.

Our worthless affection made new. ‘O God, you search me and you know me. All my thoughts lie open to your gaze. When I walk or lie down, you go before me, Ever the maker and keeper of my days. You know my resting and my rising. You discern my purpose from afar and with love everlasting you besiege me: In ev’ry moment of life or death, you are. Before a word is on my tongue, Lord, you have known its meaning through and through. You are with me beyond my understanding: God of my present, my past and future too.  Although your Spirit is upon me, still I search for shelter from your light. There is nowhere on earth I can escape you: Even the darkness is radiant in your sight. For you created me and shaped me, gave me life within my mother’s womb. For the wonder of who I am, I praise you: Safe in your hands, all creation is made new.”

The Poetics of the Spice Trade : Romantic Consumerism and the Exotic by Timothy Morton: Orientalist Strides in Modern Times: Historical and Theoretical Considerations.

Noble Dreams

Noble Dreams, Wicked Pleasures. Orientalism in America, 18th century.

Spice status as a cultural marker, halfway between object and sign, goods and money. Spice in its consumption becomes an index of social value. It is a highly self-reflexive kind of substance-sign: `about’-ness is what it is `about’. However much spice is brought into the realm of intellectus, it also still remains within; the realm of the res as a hard kernel of the Real, a flow of desire. The poetic uses of spice in the Romantic period were partially caught up in orientalism, as is evident in images of spice as a metaphor about poetry itself. The luxurious, highly spiced dinner in Byron’s Don Juan iii (1818-20) includes wall hangings that feature delicate embroidery and `Soft Persian sen- tences, in lilac letters, / From poets, or the moralists their betters’ (iii.lxiv.511-12).[15] The moralisms are ironised in their juxtaposition with the scene of luxury, of which the narrator wittily remarks: These oriental writings on the wall, Quite common in those countries, are a kind Of monitors adapted to recall, Like skulls at Memphian banquets, to the mind The words which shook Belshazzar in his hall, And took his kingdom from him: You will find, Though sages may pour out their wisdom’s treasure, There is no sterner moralist than Pleasure. (iii.lxv.513-20) Pleasure acts as both poison and cure, a phenomenon closely associated with the representation of spice in Milton. The stern message is inscribed into the fabric of the arabesqued wall, the `Oriental’ writing functioning as in De Quincey both as the promise and as the stern message is inscribed into the fabric of the arabesqued wall, the `Oriental’ writing functioning as in De Quincey both as the promise and as the threat of Otherness, as meaning but also as exquisitely embodied signifiers, `Embroider’d delicately o’er with blue’ (iii.lxiv.510). The `sentences’ are `Soft’ and `Persian’, evoking luxury in their literal, tongue-in-cheek materiality. They also evoke the Asiatic, dangerously copious style desired and feared by masculine Renaissance rhetoricians flexing their Arabic-inspired intellectual muscles.

Spice plays

The dinner made about a hundred dishes; Lamb and pistachio nuts – in short, all meats, And saffron soups, and sweetbreads; and the fishes Were of the finest that e’er flounced in nets, Drest to a Sybarite’s most pamper’d wishes; The beverage was various sherbets Of raisin, orange, and pomegranate juice, Squeezed through the rind, which makes it best for use. These were ranged round, each in its crystal ewer, And fruits, and date-bread loaves closed the repast, And Mocha’s berry, from Arabia pure, In small fine China cups, came in at last; Gold cups of filigree made to secure The hand from burning underneath them placed, Cloves, cinnamon, and saffron too were boil’d Up with the coffee, which (I think) they spoil’d. (iii.lxii-lxiii.489-50.

orientalism

Orientalism as poetic fancy.

In pursuing the association of spice with money and appearance, The Poetics of Spice is informed by Shell’s analysis of relationships between money, language and thought, though it also departs from this analysis. If, as Shell observes, coined money is as metaphorical as paper money,[19] how does it appear so? Is this only a feature of money visible to us, retrospectively, in the wake of the move towards paper money? If the discourses of spice constitute various ideologies, The Poetics of Spice sees the orientalism inherent in its topic’s emphasis on the play of surfaces as part of the ideologies which that topic sustains. Poetics of Spice is meant to be a study of the cultural forms of commodity fetishism.

Women and Satyagraha, Nobility denied.

Women Satyagrahis, Nobility denied.

Propriété et Loi: Frédéric Bastiat. http://bastiat.org/. The French Revolt of the 18th century. Virtues are the same for God no matter the time, place, condition and lives. Redux as Satyagraha of the soul.

Bastiat, the Architect of French Law and Theory.

Bastiat, the Architect of French Law and Theory.

La confiance de mes concitoyens m’a revêtu du titre de législateur. The confidence of my fellow citizens has invested me with the title of legislator.

Ce titre, je l’aurais certes décliné, si je l’avais compris comme faisait Rousseau.  

I should certainly have declined that title if I had understood it as Rousseau did.

« Celui qui ose entreprendre d’instituer un peuple, dit-il, doit se sentir en état de changer, pour ainsi dire, la nature humaine, de transformer chaque individu qui, par lui-même, est un tout parfait et solitaire, en partie d’un plus grand tout dont cet individu reçoive en quelque sorte sa vie et son être; d’altérer la constitution physique de l’homme pour la renforcer, etc., etc… S’il est vrai qu’un grand prince est un homme rare, que sera-ce d’un grand législateur? Le premier n’a qu’à suivre le modèle que l’autre doit proposer. Celui-ci est le mécanicien qui invente la machine, celui-là n’est que l’ouvrier qui la monte et la fait marcher. » 

Whoever ventures to undertake the founding of a nation,” he says, should feel himself capable of changing human nature, so to speak; of transforming each individual, who by himself is a perfect and separate whole, into a part of a greater whole, from which that individual somehow receives his life and his being; of changing the physical constitution of man in order to strengthen it, etc., etc … If it be true that a great prince is a rarity, what, then, is to be said of a great law- giver? The first has only to follow the model that the other constructs. The latter is the artificer who invents the machine; the former is only the operator who turns it on and runs it.

Rousseau, étant convaincu que l’état social était d’invention humaine, devait placer très haut la loi et le législateur. Entre le législateur et le reste des hommes, il voyait la distance ou plutôt l’abîme qui sépare le mécanicien de la matière inerte dont la machine est composée. 

Rousseau, being convinced that society is a human contrivance, found it necessary to place law and the lawgiver on an extremely lofty elevation. He saw between the lawgiver and the rest of mankind as great a distance, or rather as great a gulf, as that which separates the inventor of the machine from the inert matter of which it is composed.

Selon lui, la loi devait transformer les personnes, créer ou ne créer pas la propriété. Selon moi, la société, les personnes et les propriétés existent antérieurement aux lois, et, pour me renfermer dans un sujet spécial, je dirai: Ce n’est pas parce qu’il y a des lois qu’il y a des propriétés, mais parce qu’il y a des propriétés qu’il y a des lois. 

In his opinion, the law should transform persons and should create or not create property. In my opinion, society, persons, and property exist prior to the law, and–to restrict myself specifically to the last of these–I would say: Property does not exist because there are laws, but laws exist because there is property.

L’opposition de ces deux systèmes est radicale. Les conséquences qui en dérivent vont s’éloignant sans cesse; qu’il me soit donc permis de bien préciser la question. 

The opposition between these two systems is fundamental. Since the consequences that follow from them keep eluding us, I hope I may be permitted to make the question very precise.

J’avertis d’abord que je prends le mot propriété dans le sens général, et non au sens restreint de propriété foncière. Je regrette, et probablement tous les économistes regrettent avec moi, que ce mot réveille involontairement en nous l’idée de la possession du sol. J’entends par propriété le droit qu’a le travailleur sur la valeur qu’il a créée par son travail. 

First, let me state that I use the word property in the general sense, and not in the limited sense of landed property. I regret, and probably all economists regret with me, that this word involuntarily evokes in us the idea of the possession of land. By property I understand the right that the worker has to the value that he has created by his labor.

Cela posé, je me demande si ce droit est de création légale, ou s’il n’est pas au contraire antérieur et supérieur à la loi? S’il a fallu que la loi vint donner naissance au droit de propriété, ou si, au contraire, la propriété était un fait et un droit préexistants qui ont donné naissance à la loi? Dans le premier cas, le législateur a pour mission d’organiser, modifier, supprimer même la propriété, s’il le trouve bon; dans le second, ses attributions se bornent à la garantir, à la faire respecter. 

Now, this much granted, I ask whether this right is created by, law, or whether it is not, on the contrary, prior and superior to the law; whether law is needed to give rise to the right to property, or whether, on the contrary, property is a pre-existing fact and right that gave rise to law. In the first case, it is the function of the legislator to organize, modify, and even eliminate property if he deems it good to do so; in the second, his jurisdiction is limited to guaranteeing and safeguarding property rights.

Dans le préambule d’un projet de constitution publié par un des plus grands penseurs des temps modernes, M. Lamennais, je lis ces mots:

 In the preamble to a draft for a constitution, published by one of the greatest thinkers of modern times, M. de Lamennais [Felicite de Lamennais French philosopher, Catholic priest, reformer, and ardent champion of the working classes. I find the following words: 

Le peuple déclare qu’il reconnaît des droits et des devoirs antérieurs et supérieurs à toutes les lois positives et indépendants d’elles. Ces droits et ces devoirs, directement émanés de Dieu, se résument dans le triple dogme qu’expriment ces mots sacrés: Égalité, Liberté, Fraternité.” 

The people declare that they recognize rights and duties prior and superior to all positive laws and independent of them. These rights and duties, emanating directly from God, are summed up in the triple dogma which these sacred words express: Equality, Liberty, Fraternity.

Je me demande si le droit de Propriété n’est pas un de ceux qui, bien loin de dériver de la loi positive, précédent la loi et sont sa raison d’être? Ce n’est pas, comme on pourrait le croire, une question subtile et oiseuse. Elle est immense, elle est fondamentale. 

I ask whether the right to property is not one of those rights which, far from springing from positive law, are prior to the law and are the reason for its existence. This is not, as might be thought, a theoretical and idle question. It is of tremendous, of fundamental importance.

Sa solution intéresse au plus haut degré la société, et l’on en sera convaincu, j’espère, quand j’aurai comparé, dans leur origine et par leurs effets, les deux systèmes en présence. 

Its solution concerns society most urgently, and the reader will be convinced of this, I hope, after I have compared the two systems in question in regard to their origin and their consequences.

Les économistes pensent que la Propriété est un fait providentiel comme la Personne. Le Code ne donne pas l’existence à l’une plus qu’à l’autre. La Propriété est une conséquence nécessaire de la constitution de l’homme. 

Economists believe that property is a providential fact, like the human person. The law does not bring the one into existence any more than it does the other. Property is a necessary consequence of the nature of man.

Dans la force du mot, l’homme naît propriétaire, parce qu’il naît avec des besoins dont la satisfaction est indispensable à la vie, avec des organes et des facultés dont l’exercice est indispensable à la satisfaction de ces besoins. Les facultés ne sont que le prolongement de la personne; la propriété n’est que le prolongement des facultés. Séparer l’homme de ses facultés, c’est le faire mourir; séparer l’homme du produit de ses facultés, c’est encore le faire mourir.  

In the full sense of the word, man is born a proprietor, because he is born with wants whose satisfaction is necessary to life, and with organs and faculties whose exercise is indispensable to the satisfaction of these wants. Faculties are only an extension of the person; and property is nothing but an extension of the faculties. To separate a man from his faculties is to cause him to die; to separate a man from the product of his faculties is likewise to cause him to die.

Il y a des publicistes qui se préoccupent beaucoup de savoir comment Dieu aurait dû faire l’homme: pour nous, nous étudions l’homme tel que Dieu l’a fait; nous constatons qu’il ne peut vivre sans pourvoir à ses besoins; qu’il ne peut pourvoir à ses besoins sans travail, et qu’il ne peut travailler s’il n’est pas sûr d’appliquer à ses besoins le fruit de son travail.  

There are some political theorists who are very much concerned with knowing how God ought to have made man. We, for our part, study man as God has made him. We observe that he cannot live without providing for his wants, that he cannot provide for his wants without labor, and that he will not perform any labor if he is not sure of applying the fruit of his labor to the satisfaction of his wants.

Voilà pourquoi nous pensons que la Propriété est d’institution divine, et que c’est sa sûreté ou sa sécurité qui est l’objet de la loi humaine.

That is why we believe that property has been divinely instituted, and that the object of human law is its protection or security.

Il est si vrai que la Propriété est antérieure à la loi, qu’elle est reconnue même parmi les sauvages qui n’ont pas de lois, ou du moins de lois écrites. Quand un sauvage a consacré son travail à se construire une hutte, personne ne lui en dispute la possession ou la Propriété. Sans doute un autre sauvage plus vigoureux peut l’en chasser, mais ce n’est pas sans indigner et alarmer la tribu tout entière. C’est même cet abus de la force qui donne naissance à l’association à la convention, à la loi, qui met la force publique au service de la Propriété. Donc la Loi naît de la Propriété, bien loin que la Propriété naisse de la Loi. 

So true is it that property is prior to law that it is recognized even among savages who do not have laws, or at least not written laws. When a savage has devoted his labor to constructing a hut, no one will dispute his possession or ownership of it. To be sure, another, stronger savage may chase him out of it, but not without angering and alarming the whole tribe. It is this very abuse of force which gives rise to association, to common agreement, to law, and which puts the public police force at the service of property. Hence, law is born of property, instead of property being born of law.

On peut dire que le principe de la propriété est reconnu jusque parmi les animaux. L’hirondelle soigne paisiblement sa jeune famille dans le nid qu’elle a construit par ses efforts.

 One may say that the principle of property is recognized even among animals. The swallow peacefully cares for its young in the nest that it has built by its own efforts.

La plante même vit et se développe par assimilation, par appropriation. Elle s’approprie les substances, les gaz, les sels qui sont à sa portée. Il suffirait d’interrompre ce phénomène pour la faire dessécher et périr. 

Even plants live and develop by assimilation, by appropriation. They appropriate the substances, the gases, the salts that are within their reach. Any interruption in this process is all that is needed to make them wither and die.

De même l’homme vit et se développe par appropriation. L’appropriation est un phénomène naturel, providentiel, essentiel à la vie, et la propriété n’est que l’appropriation devenue un droit par le travail. Quand le travail a rendu assimilables, appropriables des substances qui ne l’étaient pas, je ne vois vraiment pas comment on pourrait prétendre que, de droit, le phénomène de l’appropriation doit s’accomplir au profit d’un autre individu que celui qui a exécuté le travail.

Man, too, lives and develops by appropriation. Appropriation is a natural phenomenon, providential and essential to life; and property is only appropriation that labor has made a right. When labor has rendered substances assimilable and appropriable that were not so before, I do not really see how it can be alleged that, by right, the act of appropriation should be performed for the benefit of another individual than the one who has done the work.

C’est en raison de ces faits primordiaux, conséquences nécessaires de la constitution même de l’homme, que la Loi intervient. Comme l’aspiration vers la vie et le développement peut porter l’homme fort à dépouiller l’homme faible, et à violer ainsi le droit du travail, il a été convenu que la force de tous serait consacrée à prévenir et réprimer la violence. La mission de la Loi est donc de faire respecter la Propriété. Ce n’est pas la Propriété qui est conventionnelle, mais la Loi. 

It is because of these primordial facts, which are necessary consequences of the very nature of man, that the law intervenes. As the desire for life and self-development can induce the strong man to despoil the weak, and thus to violate his right to the fruits of his labor, it has been agreed that the combined force of all members of society should be devoted to preventing and repressing violence. The function of the law, then, is to safeguard the right to property. It is not property that is a matter of agreement, but law. 

Recherchons maintenant l’origine du système opposé. Let us now seek for the origin of the opposing system.  Toutes nos constitutions passées proclament que la Propriété est sacrée, ce qui semble assigner pour but à l’association commune le libre développement, soit des individualités, soit des associations particulières, par le travail. Ceci implique que la Propriété est un droit antérieur à la Loi, puisque la Loi n’aurait pour objet que de garantir la Propriété.  

All our past constitutions proclaim that property is sacred, a fact that seems to indicate that the goal of social organization is the free development of private associations or individuals through their labor. This implies that the right to property is prior to the law, since the sole object of the law would be to protect property.

Mais je me demande si cette déclaration n’a pas été introduite dans nos chartes pour ainsi dire instinctivement, à titre de phraséologie, de lettre morte, et si surtout elle est au fond de toutes les convictions sociales?  

But I wonder whether such a declaration has not been introduced into our constitutions instinctively, so to speak, as a mere pious phrase, as a dead letter, and whether, above all, it underlies all our social convictions.

 Or, s’il est vrai, comme on l’a dit, que la littérature soit l’expression de la société, il est permis de concevoir des doutes à cet égard; car jamais, certes, les publicistes, après avoir respectueusement salué le principe de la propriété, n’ont autant invoqué l’intervention de la loi, non pour faire respecter la Propriété, mais pour modifier, altérer, transformer, équilibrer, pondérer, et organiser la propriété, le crédit et le travail. 

Now, if it is true, as has been said, that literature is the expression of society, doubts may well be raised in this regard; for never, certainly, have political theorists, after having respectfully saluted the principle of property, invoked so much the intervention of the law, not to safeguard property rights, but to modify, impair, transform, balance, equalize, and organize property, credit, and labor.

Or, ceci suppose qu’on attribue à la Loi, et par suite au Législateur, une puissance absolue sur les personnes et les propriétés. Now, this supposes that an absolute power over persons and property is imputed to the law, and hence to the legislator.

Nous pouvons en être affligés, nous ne devons pas en être surpris. This may distress us, but it should not surprise us. Où puisons-nous nos idées sur ces matières et jusqu’à la notion du Droit? Dans les livres latins, dans le Droit romain. 

Whence do we derive our ideas on these matters, and even our very notion of rights? From Latin literature and Roman law.

Je n’ai pas fait mon Droit, mais il me suffit de savoir que c’est là la source de nos théories, pour affirmer qu’elles sont fausses.

I have not studied law, but it is sufficient for me to know that the source of our theories is in Roman law, to affirm that they are false.

Les Romains devaient considérer la Propriété comme un fait purement conventionnel, comme un produit, comme une création artificielle de la Loi écrite. Évidemment, ils ne pouvaient, ainsi que le fait l’économie politique, remonter jusqu’à la constitution même de l’homme, et apercevoir le rapport et l’enchaînement nécessaire qui existent entre ces phénomènes: besoins, facultés, travail, propriété. C’eût été un contresens et un suicide. Comment eux, qui vivaient de rapine, dont toutes les propriétés étaient le fruit de la spoliation, qui avaient fondé leurs moyens d’existence sur le labeur des esclaves, comment auraient-ils pu, sans ébranler les fondements de leur société, introduire dans la législation cette pensée que le vrai titre de la propriété, c’est le travail qui l’a produite? Non, ils ne pouvaient ni le dire, ni le penser. Ils devaient avoir recours à cette définition empirique de la propriété, jus utendi et abutendi, définition qui n’a de relation qu’avec les effets, et non avec les causes, non avec les origines; car les origines, ils étaient bien forcés de les tenir dans l’ombre. 

The Romans could not fail to consider property anything but a purely conventional fact–a product, an artificial creation, of written law. Evidently they could not go back, as political economy does, to the very nature of man and perceive the relations and necessary connections that exist among wants, faculties, labor, and property. It would have been absurd and suicidal for them to have done so. How could they, when they lived by looting, when all their property was the fruit of plunder, when they had based their whole way of life on the labor of slaves; how could they, without shattering the foundations of their society, introduce into their legislation the idea that the true title to property is the labor that produces it? No, they could neither say it nor think it. They had to have recourse to a purely empirical definition of property — jus utendi et abutendi– a definition that refers only to effects and not to causes or origins, for they were indeed forced to conceal the latter from view.

Il est triste de penser que la science du Droit, chez nous, au dix-neuvième siècle, en est encore aux idées que la présence de l’Esclavage avait dû susciter dans l’antiquité; mais cela s’explique. L’enseignement du Droit est monopolisé en France, et le monopole exclut le progrès.  

It is sad to think that the science of law as we know it in the nineteenth century is still based on principles formulated in antiquity to justify slavery; but this is easily explained. The teaching of law is monopolized in France, and monopoly excludes progress.

Il est vrai que les juristes ne font pas toute l’opinion publique; mais il faut dire que l’éducation universitaire et cléricale prépare merveilleusement la jeunesse française à recevoir, sur ces matières, les fausses notions des juristes, puisque, comme pour mieux s’en assurer, elle nous plonge tous, pendant les dix plus belles années de notre vie, dans cette atmosphère de guerre et d’esclavage qui enveloppait et pénétrait la société romaine.  

It is true that jurists do not create all of public opinion; but it must be said that university and clerical education prepares French youth marvelously to accept the false ideas of jurists on these matters, since, the better to assure this, it plunges all of us, during the ten best years of our lives, in the atmosphere of war and slavery that enveloped and permeated Roman society.

Ne soyons donc pas surpris de voir se reproduire, dans le dix-huitième siècle, cette idée romaine que la propriété est un fait conventionnel et d’institution légale; que, bien loin que la Loi soit un corollaire de la Propriété, c’est la Propriété qui est un corollaire de la Loi. On sait que, selon Rousseau, non seulement la propriété, mais la société toute entière était le résultat d’un contrat, d’une invention née dans la tête du Législateur.  

Do not be surprised, then, to see reproduced in the eighteenth century the Roman idea that property is a matter of convention and of legal institution; that, far from law being a corollary of property, it is property that is a corollary of law. We know that, for Rousseau, not only property but the whole of society was the result of a contract, of an invention, a product of the legislator’s mind.

L’ordre social est un droit sacré qui sert de base à tous les autres. Cependant ce droit ne vient point de la nature. Il est donc fondé sur les conventions.  

The social order is a sacred right that serves as the basis of all the others. However, this right does not come from Nature. Therefore, it is founded on convention.

Ainsi le droit qui sert de base à tous les autres est purement conventionnel. Donc la propriété, qui est un droit postérieur, est conventionnelle aussi. Elle ne vient pas de la nature.  

Thus, the right that serves as the basis of all the others is purely conventional. Hence, property, which is a subsequent right, is also conventional. It does not come from Nature.

Robespierre était imbu des idées de Rousseau. Dans ce que dit l’élève sur la propriété, on reconnaîtra les théories et jusqu’aux formes oratoires du maître. 

Robespierre was imbued with the ideas of Rousseau. In what the disciple says about property, we recognize the theories and even the rhetorical forms of the master.

Citoyens, je vous proposerai d’abord quelques articles nécessaires pour compléter votre théorie de la propriété. Que ce mot n’alarme personne. Âmes de boue, qui n’estimez que l’or, je ne veux pas toucher à vos trésors, quelque impure qu’en soit la source… Pour moi, j’aimerais mieux être né dans la cabane de Fabricius que dans le palais de Lucullus, etc., etc.  

Citizens, I propose to you first a few necessary articles to complete our theory of property. Let this word alarm no one. You sordid souls, who esteem only gold, do not be frightened; I do not wish to lay hands on your treasures, however impure their source … For my part, I would rather be born in the hut of Fabricius than in the palace of Lucullus, etc., etc.

Je ferai observer ici que, lorsqu’on analyse la notion de propriété, il est irrationnel et dangereux de faire de ce mot le synonyme d’opulence, et surtout d’opulence mal acquise.  

Here it should be noted that, when one analyzes the notion of property, it is irrational and dangerous to treat this term as synonymous with opulence, and, even worse, with ill-gotten opulence.

La chaumière de Fabricius est une propriété aussi bien que le palais de Lucullus. Mais qu’il me soit permis d’appeler l’attention du lecteur sur la phrase suivante, qui renferme tout le système: 

The hut of Fabricius [Gaius Luscinus Fabricius, distinguished Roman general and consul] is property just as much as the palace of Lucullus. But let me call the reader’s attention to the following words, which sum up the whole system.

En définissant la liberté, ce premier besoin de l’homme, le plus sacré des droits qu’il tient de la nature, nous avons dit, avec raison, qu’elle avait pour limite le droit d’autrui. Pourquoi n’avez-vous pas appliqué ce principe à la propriété, qui est une institution sociale, comme si les lois éternelles de la nature étaient moins inviolables que les conventions des hommes?

In defining freedom, man’s primary need, the most sacred of his natural rights, we have said, quite correctly, that it has as its limit the rights of others. Why have you not applied this principle to property, which is socially instituted, as if the eternal laws of Nature were less inviolable than the conventions of men?

Après ces préambules, Robespierre établit les principes en ces termes: 

After these introductory remarks, Robespierre formulates his principles in these terms:

Art, 1er. La propriété est le droit qu’a chaque citoyen de jouir et de disposer de la portion de biens qui lui est garantie par la loi.
Art. 1. Property is the right that each citizen has to enjoy and to dispose of the portion of goods that is guaranteed to him by law.
Art. 2. Le droit de propriété est borné, comme tous les autres, par l’obligation de respecter les droits d’autrui. »

Art. 2. The right to property is limited, as are all others, by the obligation to respect the rights of others.

Ainsi Robespierre met en opposition la Liberté et la Propriété. Ce sont deux droits d’origine différente: l’un vient de la nature, l’autre est d’institution sociale. Le premier est naturel, le second conventionnel.

Thus, Robespierre sets up an opposition between liberty and property. These are two rights of different origin: one comes from Nature; the other is socially instituted. The first is natural; the second, conventional.

Quoi qu’il en soit, il est certain que Robespierre, à l’exemple de Rousseau, considérait la propriété comme une institution sociale, comme une convention. Il ne la rattachait nullement à son véritable titre, qui est le travail. C’est le droit, disait-il, de disposer de la portion de biens garantie par la loi. Je n’ai pas besoin de rappeler ici qu’à travers Rousseau et Robespierre la notion romaine sur la propriété s’est transmise à toutes nos écoles dites socialistes. On sait que le premier volume de Louis Blanc, sur la Révolution, est un dithyrambe au philosophe de Genève et au chef de la Convention.

 I do not need to recall here that through Rousseau and Robespierre the Roman idea of property has been transmitted to all our self-styled socialist schools of thought. We know that the first volume of Louis Blanc, on the Revolution, is a dithyramb to the philosopher of Geneva and to the leader of the Convention.

Ainsi, cette idée que le droit de propriété est d’institution sociale, qu’il est une invention du législateur, une création de la loi, en d’autres termes, qu’il est inconnu à l’homme dans l’état de nature, cette idée, dis-je, s’est transmise des Romains jusqu’à nous, à travers l’enseignement du droit, les études classiques, les publicistes du dix-huitième siècle, les révolutionnaires de 93, et les modernes organisateurs.  

Thus, this idea that the right to property is socially instituted, that it is an invention of the legislator, a creation of the law–in other words, that it is unknown to men in the state of nature– has been transmitted from the Romans down to us, through the teaching of law, classical studies, the political theorists of the eighteenth century, the revolutionaries of 1793, and the modem proponents of a planned social order.  The fact that Robespierre imposes identical limits on these two rights should have led him, it would seem, to think that they come from the same source. Whether liberty or property is in question, to respect the right of others is not to destroy or impair the right, but rather to recognize and confirm it. It is precisely because property as well as liberty is a right prior to the law that both exist only on condition of respecting the like right of others, and it is the function of the law to see that this limit is respected, which means to recognize and support this very principle.

On sait que, selon Rousseau, non seulement la propriété, mais la société toute entière était le résultat d’un contrat, d’une invention née dans la tête du Législateur. Quoi qu’il en soit, il est certain que Robespierre, à l’exemple de Rousseau, considérait la propriété comme une institution sociale, comme une convention.

 In any case, it is certain that Robespierre, following Rousseau’s example, considered property as a social institution, as a convention. He did not connect it at all with its true justification, which is labor. It is the right, he said, to dispose of the portion of goods guaranteed by law.

Parmi ces projets, ceux qui ont les plus attiré l’attention publique sont ceux de Fourier, de Saint-Simon, d’Owen, de Cabet, de Louis Blanc. Mais ce serait folie de croire qu’il n’y a que ces cinq modes possibles d’organisation. Le nombre en est illimité. Chaque matin peut en faire éclore un nouveau, plus séduisant que celui de la veille, et je laisse à penser ce qu’il adviendrait de l’humanité si, alors qu’une de ces inventions lui serait imposée, il s’en révélait tout à coup une autre plus spécieuse. Elle serait réduite à l’alternative ou de changer tous les matins son mode d’existence, ou de persévérer à tout jamais dans une voie reconnue fausse, par cela seul qu’elle y serait une fois entrée.  

Among these proposals, the ones that have attracted the most public attention are those of Fourier, Saint-Simon, Owen, Cabet, and Louis Blanc. But it would be absurd to believe that these five modes of organization are the only ones possible. There are an unlimited number of them. Each morning a new one may appear, more seductive than that of the day before, and I leave it to your imagination to envision what would become of mankind if, as soon as one of these plans were imposed on us, another more plausible were suddenly to make its appearance. Mankind would be reduced to the alternative either of changing its mode of life every morning, or of persevering forever along a road recognized as false, simply because it had already been entered upon.

Une seconde conséquence est d’exciter chez tous les rêveurs la soif du pouvoir. J’imagine une organisation du travail. Exposer mon système et attendre que les hommes l’adoptent s’il est bon, ce serait supposer que le principe d’action est en eux. Mais dans le système que j’examine, le principe d’action réside dans le Législateur. « Le législateur, comme dit Rousseau, doit se sentir de force à transformer la nature humaine. » Donc, ce à quoi je dois aspirer, c’est à devenir législateur afin d’imposer l’ordre social de mon invention. 

A second result is to arouse in all these dreamers a thirst for power. Suppose I conceive of a system for the organization of labor. To set forth my system and wait for men to adopt it if it is good, would be to assume that the initiative lies with them. But in the system that I am examining, the initiative lies with the legislator. “The legislator,” as Rousseau says, “should feel strong enough to transform human nature.” Hence, what I should aspire to is to become a legislator, in order to impose on mankind a social order of my own invention.

Il est clair encore que les systèmes qui ont pour base cette idée que le droit de propriété est d’institution sociale, aboutissent tous ou au privilège le plus concentré, ou au communisme le plus intégral, selon les mauvaises ou les bonnes intentions de l’inventeur. S’il a des desseins sinistres, il se servira de la loi pour enrichir quelques-uns aux dépens de tous. S’il obéit à des sentiments philanthropiques, il voudra égaliser le bien-être, et, pour cela, il pensera à stipuler en faveur de chacun une participation légale et uniforme aux produits créés. Reste à savoir si, dans cette donnée, la création des produits est possible. 

Moreover, it is clear that the systems which are based on the idea that the right to property is socially instituted all end either in the most concentrated privilege or in complete communism, depending upon the evil or good intentions of the inventor. If his purposes are sinister, he will make use of the law to enrich a few at the expense of all. If he is philanthropically inclined, he will try to equalize the standard of living, and, to that end, he will devise some means of assuring everyone a legal claim to an equal share in whatever is produced. It remains to be seen whether, in that case, it is possible to produce anything at all.

À cet égard, le Luxembourg nous a présenté récemment un spectacle fort extraordinaire. N’a-t-on pas entendu, en plein dix-neuvième siècle, quelques jours après la révolution de Février, faite au nom de la liberté, un homme plus qu’un ministre, un membre du gouvernement provisoire, un fonctionnaire revêtu d’une autorité révolutionnaire et illimitée, demander froidement si, dans la répartition des salaires, il était bon d’avoir égard à la force, au talent, à l’activité, à l’habileté de l’ouvrier, c’est-à-dire à la richesse produite; ou bien si, ne tenant aucun compte de ces vertus personnelles, ni de leur effet utile, il ne vaudrait pas mieux donner à tous désormais une rémunération uniforme? Question qui revient à celle-ci: Un mètre de drap porté sur le marché par un paresseux se vendra-t-il pour le même prix que deux mètres offerts par un homme laborieux? Et, chose, qui passe toute croyance, cet homme a proclamé qu’il préférait l’uniformité des profits, quel que fût le travail offert en vente, et il a décidé ainsi, dans sa sagesse, que, quoique deux soient deux par nature, ils ne seraient plus qu’un de par la loi. 

In this regard, the Luxembourg [The meeting-place of the National Assembly has recently presented us with a most extraordinary spectacle. Did we not hear, right in the middle of the nineteenth century, a few days after the February Revolution (a revolution made in the name of liberty) a man, more than a cabinet minister, actually a member of the provisional government, a public official vested with revolutionary and unlimited authority, coolly inquire whether in the allotment of wages it was good to consider the strength, the talent, the industriousness, the capability of the worker, that is, the wealth he produced; or whether, in disregard of these personal virtues or of their useful effect, it would not be better to give everyone henceforth a uniform remuneration? This is tantamount to asking: Will a yard of cloth brought to market by an idler sell at the same price as two yards offered by an industrious man? And, what passes all belief, this same individual proclaimed that he would prefer profits to be uniform, whatever the quality or the quantity of the product offered for sale, and he therefore decided in his wisdom that, although two are two by nature, they are to be no more than one by law.

Voilà où l’on arrive quand on part de ce point que la loi est plus forte que la nature. 

This is where we get when we start from the assumption that the law is stronger than nature.

L’auditoire, à ce qu’il paraît, a compris que la constitution même de l’homme se révoltait contre un tel arbitraire; que jamais on ne ferait qu’un mètre de drap donnât droit à la même rémunération que deux mètres. Que s’il en était ainsi, la concurrence qu’on veut anéantir serait remplacée par une autre concurrence mille fois plus funeste; que chacun ferait à qui travaillerait moins, à qui déploierait la moindre activité, puisque aussi bien, de par la loi, la récompense serait toujours garantie et égale pour tous. 

Those whom he addressed apparently understood that such arbitrariness is repugnant to the very nature of man, that one yard of cloth could never be made to give the right to the same remuneration as two yards. In such a case, the competition that was to be abolished would be replaced by another competition a thousand times worse: each worker would strive to be the one who worked the least, who exerted himself the least, since, by law, the wage would always be guaranteed and would be the same for all.

Mais le citoyen Blanc avait prévu l’objection, et, pour prévenir ce doux farniente, hélas! si naturel à l’homme, quand le travail n’est pas rémunéré, il a imaginé de faire dresser dans chaque commune un poteau où seraient inscrits les noms des paresseux. Mais il n’a pas dit s’il y aurait des inquisiteurs pour découvrir le péché de paresse, des tribunaux pour le juger, et des gendarmes pour exécuter la sentence. Il est à remarquer que les utopistes ne se préoccupent jamais de l’immense machine gouvernementale, qui peut seule mettre en mouvement leur mécanique légale.

But Citizen [This title of address used during the French Revolution has. of course, an ironic connotation here, much like the term “Comrade” in our time. Blanc had foreseen this objection, and, to prevent this dolce far niente so natural in man, alas! when his work is not remunerated, he thought of the idea of erecting in each community a post where the names of the idlers would be inscribed. But he did not say whether there would be inquisitors to spy out the sin of laziness, tribunals to judge it, and police to carry out the sentence. It is to be noted that the utopians are never concerned with the vast governmental apparatus that alone can set their legal mechanism in motion.

Comme les délégués du Luxembourg se montraient quelque peu incrédules, est apparu le citoyen Vidal, secrétaire du citoyen Blanc, qui a achevé la pensée du maître. À l’exemple de Rousseau, le citoyen Vidal ne se propose rien moins que de changer la nature de l’homme et les lois de la Providence.

When the delegates of the Luxembourg appeared a bit incredulous, up strode Citizen Vidal, [Francois Vidal, journalist, politician, and writer on economic subjects. An ardent advocate of government intervention in the relations between labor and capital, he edited a number of publications, including La Presse.

Il a plu à la Providence de placer dans l’individu les besoins et leurs conséquences, les facultés et leurs conséquences, créant ainsi l’intérêt personnel, autrement dit, l’instinct de la conservation et l’amour du développement comme le grand ressort de l’humanité. M. Vidal va changer tout cela. Il a regardé l’œuvre de Dieu, et il a vu qu’elle n’était pas bonne. En conséquence, partant de ce principe que la loi et le législateur peuvent tout, il va supprimer, par décret, l’intérêt personnel. Il y substitue le point d’honneur. Ce n’est plus pour vivre, faire vivre et élever leur famille que les hommes travailleront, mais pour obéir au point d’honneur, pour éviter le fatal poteau, comme si ce nouveau mobile n’était pas encore de l’intérêt personnel d’une autre espèce.  

It has pleased Providence to give to every individual certain wants and their consequences, as well as certain faculties and their consequences, thus creating self-interest, otherwise known as the instinct for self- preservation and the desire for self-development, as the great motive force of mankind. M. Vidal is going to change all this. He has looked at the work of God, and he has seen that it was not good. Consequently, proceeding from the principle that the law and the legislator can do everything, he is going to suppress self-interest by decree. He substitutes for it the code of honor. It is no longer in order to live or to raise and support their families that men are to work, but to maintain their honor, to avoid the fatal post, as if this new motive were not again self-interest of another sort.

M. Vidal cite sans cesse ce que le point d’honneur fait faire aux armées. Mais, hélas! il faut tout dire, et si l’on veut enrégimenter les travailleurs, qu’on nous dise donc si le Code militaire, avec ses trente cas de peine de mort, deviendra le Code des ouvriers? 

Vidal keeps incessantly citing what adherence to a code of honor has made armies do. But, alas! let him tell us the whole truth, and if his plan is to regiment the workers, let him say, then, whether martial law, with its thirty crimes punishable by death, is to become the code of labor.

Un effet plus frappant encore du principe funeste que je m’efforce ici de combattre, c’est l’incertitude qu’il tient toujours suspendue, comme l’épée de Damoclès, sur le travail, le capital, le commerce et l’industrie; et ceci est si grave que j’ose réclamer toute l’attention du lecteur.

 An even more striking effect of the harmful principle that I am here seeking to combat is the uncertainty that it always holds suspended, like the sword of Damocles, over labor, capital, commerce, and industry; and this is so serious that I venture to ask the reader to give his full attention to it.

Dans un pays, comme aux États-Unis, où l’on place le droit de Propriété au-dessus de la Loi, où la force publique n’a pour mission que de faire respecter ce droit naturel, chacun peut en toute confiance consacrer à la production son capital et ses bras. Il n’a pas à craindre que ses plans et ses combinaisons soient d’un instant à l’autre bouleversés par la puissance législative. 

In a country like the United States, where the right to property is placed above the law, where the sole function of the public police force is to safeguard this natural right, each person can in full confidence dedicate his capital and his labor to production. He does not have to fear that his plans and calculations will be upset from one instant to another by the legislature.

Mais quand, au contraire, posant en principe que ce n’est pas le travail, mais la Loi qui est le fondement de la Propriété, on admet tous les faiseurs d’utopies à imposer leurs combinaisons, d’une manière générale et par l’autorité des décrets, qui ne voit qu’on tourne contre le progrès industriel tout ce que la nature a mis de prévoyance et de prudence dans le cœur de l’homme? 

But when, on the contrary, acting on the principle that not labor, but the law, is the basis of property, we permit the makers of utopias to impose their schemes on us in a general way and by decree, who does not see that all the foresight and prudence that Nature has implanted in the heart of man is turned against industrial progress?

Quel est en ce moment le hardi spéculateur qui oserait monter une usine ou se livrer à une entreprise? Hier on décrète qu’il ne sera permis de travailler que pendant un nombre d’heure déterminé. Aujourd’hui on décrète que le salaire de tel genre de travail sera fixé; qui peut prévoir le décret de demain, celui d’après-demain, ceux des jours suivants? Une fois que le législateur se place à cette distance incommensurable des autres hommes; qu’il croit, en toute conscience, pouvoir disposer de leur temps, de leur travail, de leurs transactions, toutes choses qui sont des Propriétés, quel homme, sur la surface du pays, a la moindre connaissance de la position forcée où la Loi le placera demain, lui et sa profession? Et, dans de telles conditions, qui peut et veut rien entreprendre?

Where, at such a time, is the bold speculator who would dare set up a factory or engage in an enterprise? Yesterday it was decreed that he will be permitted to work only for a fixed number of hours. Today it is decreed that the wages of a certain type of labor will be fixed. Who can foresee tomorrow’s decree, that of the day after tomorrow, or those of the days following? Once the legislator is placed at this incommensurable distance from other men, and believes, in all conscience, that he can dispose of their time, their labor, and their transactions, all of which are their property, what man in the whole country has the least knowledge of the position in which the law will forcibly place him and his line of work tomorrow? And, under such conditions, who can or will undertake anything?

Je ne nie certes pas que, parmi les innombrables systèmes que ce faux principe fait éclore, un grand nombre, le plus grand nombre même ne partent d’intentions bienveillantes et généreuses. Mais ce qui est redoutable, c’est le principe lui-même. Le but manifeste de chaque combinaison particulière est d’égaliser le bien-être. Mais l’effet plus manifeste encore du principe sur lequel ces combinaisons sont fondées, c’est d’égaliser la misère; je ne dis pas assez; c’est de faire descendre aux rangs des misérables les familles aisées, et de décimer par la maladie et l’inanition les familles pauvres.  

I certainly do not deny that among the innumerable systems that this false principle gives rise to, a great number, the greater number even, originate from benevolent and generous intentions. But what is vicious is the principle itself. The manifest end of each particular plan is to equalize prosperity. But the still more manifest result of the principle on which these plans are founded is to equalize poverty; nay more, the effect is to force the well-to-do families down into the ranks of the poor and to decimate the families of the poor by sickness and starvation.

J’avoue que je suis effrayé pour l’avenir de mon pays, quand je songe à la gravité des difficultés financières que ce dangereux principe vient aggraver encore. 

I confess that I fear for the future of my country when I think of the seriousness of the financial difficulties that this dangerous principle will aggravate still further.

Au 24 février, nous avons trouvé un budget qui dépasse les proportions auxquelles la France peut raisonnablement atteindre; et, en outre, selon le ministre actuel des finances, pour près d’un milliard de dettes immédiatement exigibles. À partir de cette situation, déjà si alarmante, les dépenses ont été toujours grandissant, et les recettes diminuant sans cesse. 

On February 24, we found that we had a budget that exceeds the income that France can reasonably attain; and, beyond that, according to the present Minister of Finance, nearly a billion francs worth of debts payable immediately on demand.

Ce n’est pas tout. On a jeté au public, avec une prodigalité sans mesure, deux sortes de promesses. Selon les unes, on va le mettre en possession d’une foule innombrable d’institutions bienfaisantes, mais coûteuses. Selon les autres, on va dégrever tous les impôts. Ainsi, d’une part, on va multiplier les crèches, les salles d’asile, les écoles primaires, les écoles secondaires gratuites, les ateliers de travail, les pensions de retraite de l’industrie. On va indemniser les propriétaires d’esclaves, dédommager les esclaves eux-mêmes; l’État va fonder des institutions de crédit; prêter aux travailleurs des instruments de travail; il double l’armée, réorganise la marine, etc., etc., et d’autre part, il supprime l’impôt du sel, l’octroi et toutes les contributions les plus impopulaires.  

In this situation, already so alarming, the expenses have been continually increasing, and the receipts constantly decreasing. Nor is this all. The public has been deluged, with an unlimited prodigality, by two sorts of promises. According to one, a vast number of charitable, but costly, institutions are to be established at public expense. According to the other, all taxes are going to be reduced. Thus, on the one hand, nurseries, asylums, free primary and secondary schools, workshops, and industrial retirement pensions are going to be multiplied. Slave owners are going to be paid indemnities, and the slaves themselves are to be paid damages; the state is going to found credit institutions, lend to workers the tools of production, double the size of the army, reorganize the navy, etc., etc., and, on the other hand, it will abolish the tax on salt, tolls, and all the most unpopular excises.

Certes, quelque idée qu’on se fasse des ressources de la France, on admettra du moins qu’il faut que ces ressources se développent pour faire face à cette double entreprise si gigantesque et, en apparence, si contradictoire. 

Certainly, whatever idea one may have of France’s resources, it will at least be admitted that these resources must be developed in order to be adequate for this double enterprise, so gigantic and apparently so contradictory.

Mais voici qu’au milieu de ce mouvement extraordinaire, et qu’on pourrait considérer comme au-dessus des forces humaines, même alors que toutes les énergies du pays seraient dirigées vers le travail productif, un cri s’élève: Le droit de propriété est une création de la loi. En conséquence, le législateur peut rendre à chaque instant, et selon les théories systématiques dont il est imbu, des décrets qui bouleversent toutes les combinaisons de l’industrie. Le travailleur n’est pas propriétaire d’une chose ou d’une valeur parce qu’il l’a créée par le travail, mais parce que la loi d’aujourd’hui la lui garantit. La loi de demain peut retirer cette garantie, et alors la propriété n’est plus légitime. 

But here, in the midst of this extraordinary movement, which may be considered as above the power of man to accomplish, at the same time as all the energies of the country are being directed toward productive labor, a cry arises: The right to property is a creation of the law. Consequently, the legislator can promulgate at any time, in accordance with whatever theories he has come to accept, decrees that may upset all the calculations of industry. The worker is not the owner of a thing or of a value because he has created it by his labor, but because today’s law guarantees it. Tomorrow’s law can withdraw this guarantee, and then the ownership is no longer legitimate.

Je le demande, que doit-il arriver? C’est que le capital et le travail s’épouvantent; c’est qu’ils ne puissent plus compter sur l’avenir. Le capital, sous le coup d’une telle doctrine, se cachera, désertera, s’anéantira. Et que deviendront alors les ouvriers, ces ouvriers pour qui vous professez une affection si vive, si sincère, mais si peu éclairée? Seront-ils mieux nourris quand la production agricole sera arrêtée? Seront-ils mieux vêtus quand nul n’osera fonder une fabrique? Seront-ils plus occupés quand les capitaux auront disparu?

What must be the consequence of all this? Capital and labor will be frightened; they will no longer be able to count on the future. Capital, under the impact of such a doctrine, will hide, flee, be destroyed. And what will become, then, of the workers, those workers for whom you profess an affection so deep and sincere, but so unenlightened? Will they be better fed when agricultural production is stopped? Will they be better dressed when no one dares to build a factory? Will they have more employment when capital will have disappeared?

Et l’impôt, d’où le tirerez-vous? Et les finances, comment se rétabliront-elles? Comment paierez-vous l’armée? Comment acquitterez-vous vos dettes? Avec quel argent prêterez-vous les instruments du travail? Avec quelles ressources soutiendrez-vous ces institutions charitables, si faciles à décréter? 

And from what source will you derive the taxes? And how will you replenish the treasury? How will you pay the army? How will you meet your debts? With what money will you furnish the tools of production? With what resources will you support these charitable institutions, so easy to establish by decree?

Je me hâte d’abandonner ces tristes considérations. Il me reste à examiner dans ses conséquences le principe opposé à celui qui prévaut aujourd’hui, le principe économiste, le principe qui fait remonter au travail, et non à la loi, le droit de propriété, le principe qui dit: La Propriété existe avant la Loi; la loi n’a pour mission que de faire respecter la propriété partout où elle est, partout où elle se forme, de quelque manière que le travailleur la crée, isolément ou par association, pourvu qu’il respecte le droit d’autrui. 

I hasten to turn aside from these dreary considerations. It remains for me to examine the consequences of the principle opposed to that which prevails today, the economist’s principle, the principle that derives the right to property from labor, and not from the law, the principle which says: Property is prior to law; the sole function of the law is to safeguard the right to property wherever it exists, wherever it is formed, in whatever manner the worker produces it, whether individually or in association, provided that he respects the rights of others.

First, whereas the jurists’ principle involves virtual slavery, the economists’ principle implies liberty. Property, the right to enjoy the fruits of one’s labor, the right to work, to develop, to exercise one’s faculties, according to one’s own understanding, without the state intervening otherwise than by its protective action–this is what is meant by liberty. And I still cannot understand why the numerous partisans of the systems opposed to liberty allow the word liberty to remain on the flag of the Republic. To be sure, a few of them have effaced it in order to substitute the word solidarity. They are more honest and more logical. But they should have said communism, and not solidarity; for the solidarity of men’s interests, like property, exists outside the purview of the law.

D’abord, comme le principe des juristes renferme virtuellement l’esclavage, celui des économistes contient la liberté. La propriété, le droit de jouir du fruit de son travail, le droit de travailler, de se développer, d’exercer ses facultés, comme on l’entend, sans que l’État intervienne autrement que par son action protectrice, c’est la liberté. — Et je ne puis encore comprendre pourquoi les nombreux partisans des systèmes opposés laissent subsister sur le drapeau de la République le mot liberté. On dit que quelques-uns d’entre eux l’ont effacé pour y substituer le mot solidarité. Ceux-là sont plus francs et plus conséquents. Seulement, ils auraient dû dire communisme, et non solidarité; car la solidarité des intérêts, comme la propriété, existe en dehors de la loi.  

Moreover, it implies unity. This we have already seen. If the legislator creates the right to property, there are as many modes of property as there can be errors in the utopians’ heads, that is, an infinite number. If, on the contrary, the right to property is a providential fact, prior to all human legislation, and which it is the function of human legislation to safeguard, there is no place for any other system.

C’est encore la sécurité, et ceci est de toute évidence: qu’il soit bien reconnu, au sein d’un peuple, que chacun doit pourvoir à ses moyens d’existence, mais aussi que chacun a aux fruits de son travail un droit antérieur et supérieur à la loi; que la loi humaine n’a été nécessaire et n’est intervenue que pour garantir à tous la liberté du travail et la propriété de ses fruits; il est bien évident qu’un avenir de sécurité complète s’ouvre devant l’activité humaine.  

Beyond this, there is security; and all evidence clearly indicates that, if people sincerely recognize the obligation of every person to provide his own means of existence, as well as every person’s right to the fruits of his own labor as prior and superior to the law, if human law is needed and intervenes only to guarantee to all the freedom to engage in labor and the ownership of its fruits, then all human industry is assured a future of complete security. here is no longer reason to fear that the legislature may, with one decree after another, stifle effort, upset plans, frustrate foresight. Under the shelter of such security, capital will rapidly be created. The rapid accumulation of capital, in turn, is the sole reason for the increase in the value of labor. The working classes will, then, be well off; they themselves will co-operate to form new capital. They will be better able to rise from the status of wage earners, to invest in business enterprises, to found enterprises of their own, and to regain their dignity.

Enfin, le principe éternel que l’État ne doit pas être producteur, mais procurer la sécurité aux producteurs, entraîne nécessairement l’économie et l’ordre dans les finances publiques; par conséquent, seul il rend possible la bonne assiette et la juste répartition de l’impôt. 

Finally, the eternal principle that the state should not be a producer, but the provider of security for the producers, necessarily involves economy and order in public finances; consequently, this principle alone renders prosperity possible and a just distribution of taxes.

En effet, l’État, ne l’oublions jamais, n’a pas de ressources qui lui soient propres. Il n’a rien, il ne possède rien qu’il ne le prenne aux travailleurs. Lors donc qu’il s’ingère de tout, il substitue la triste et coûteuse activité de ses agents à l’activité privée. Si, comme aux États-Unis, on en venait à reconnaître que la mission de l’État est de procurer à tous une complète sécurité, cette mission, il pourrait la remplir avec quelques centaines de millions. Grâce à cette économie, combinée avec la prospérité industrielle, il serait enfin possible d’établir l’impôt direct, unique, frappant exclusivement la propriété réalisée de toute nature. 

Let us never forget that, in fact, the state has no resources of its own. It has nothing, it possesses nothing that it does not take from the workers. When, then, it meddles in everything, it substitutes the deplorable and costly activity of its own agents for private activity. If, as in the United States, it came to be recognized that the function of the state is to provide complete security for all, it could fulfill this function with a few hundred million francs. Thanks to this economy, combined with industrial prosperity, it would finally be possible to impose a single direct tax, levied exclusively on property of all kinds.

Mais, pour cela, il faut attendre que des expériences, peut-être cruelles, aient diminué quelque peu notre foi dans l’État et augmenté notre foi dans l’Humanité. 

But, for that, we must wait until we have learned by experience –perhaps cruel experience–to trust in the state a little less and in mankind a little more. 

Je terminerai par quelques mots sur l’Association du libre-échange. On lui a beaucoup reproché ce titre. Ses adversaires se sont réjouis, ses partisans se sont affligés de ce que les uns et les autres considéraient comme une faute. 

I shall conclude with a few words on the Association for Free Trade. [In 1846, Bastiat helped to organize the first Association for Free Trade in Bordeaux, and soon thereafter he was named secretary of a similar association established in Paris. It has been very much criticized for having adopted this name. Its adversaries have rejoiced, and its supporters have been distressed, by what both consider as a defect.

Pourquoi semer ainsi l’alarme? disaient ces derniers. Pourquoi inscrire sur votre drapeau un principe? Pourquoi ne pas vous borner à réclamer dans le tarif des douanes ces modifications sages et prudentes que le temps a rendues nécessaires, et dont l’expérience a constaté l’opportunité? “

Why spread alarm in this way?” said its supporters. “Why inscribe a principle on your banner? Why not limit yourself to demanding those wise and prudent changes in the customs duties that time has rendered necessary and experience has shown to be expedient?”

Qu’on lise le premier acte émané de notre Association, le programme rédigé dans une séance préparatoire, le 10 mai 1846; on se convaincra que ce fut là notre pensée dominante. 

If our critics will but read the first statement issued by our Association, the program drafted at a preliminary session, May 10, 1846, they will be convinced that this was our dominating idea:

 L’échange est un droit naturel comme la Propriété. Tout citoyen qui a créé ou acquis un produit, doit avoir l’option ou de l’appliquer immédiatement à son usage, ou de le céder à quiconque, sur la surface du globe, consent à lui donner en échange l’objet de ses désirs. Le priver de cette faculté, quand il n’en fait aucun usage contraire à l’ordre public et aux bonnes mœurs, et uniquement pour satisfaire la convenance d’un autre citoyen, c’est légitimer une spoliation, c’est blesser la loi de justice. 

Exchange, like property, is a natural right. Every citizen who has produced or acquired a product should have the option of applying it immediately to his own use or of giving it to whoever on the face of the earth consents to give him in exchange the object of his desires. To deprive him of this faculty, when he has committed no act contrary to public order and good morals, and solely to satisfy the convenience of another citizen, is to legitimize an act of plunder and to violate the law of justice.

Nous placions tellement la question au-dessus des tarifs que nous ajoutions: Les soussignés ne contestent pas à la société le droit d’établir, sur les marchandises qui passent la frontière, des taxes destinées aux dépenses communes, pourvu qu’elles soient déterminées par les besoins du Trésor.  

The undersigned do not contest the right of society to levy on the merchandise that crosses its borders taxes reserved for the common expense, provided that they are determined solely by the needs of the public treasury.

Mais sitôt que la taxe, perdant son caractère fiscal, a pour but de repousser le produit étranger, au détriment du fisc lui-même, afin d’exhausser artificiellement le prix du produit national similaire, et de rançonner ainsi la communauté au profit d’une classe, dès ce moment la Protection, ou plutôt la Spoliation se manifeste, et c’est là le principe que l’Association aspire à ruiner dans les esprits et à effacer complètement de nos lois.  

But as soon as the tax, losing its fiscal character, has for its object the exclusion of a foreign product, to the detriment of the treasury itself, in order to raise artificially the price of a similar domestic product, and to exact tribute from the community for the profit of one class, from that moment protection, or rather plunder, makes its appearance, and this is the principle that the Association seeks to discredit and to efface completely from our laws.

C’est encore violer les conditions de l’ordre; car quel ordre peut exister au sein d’une société où chaque industrie, aidée en cela par la loi et la force publique, cherche ses succès dans l’oppression de toutes les autres? I

t is, further, to violate the conditions of public order; for what order can exist in a society in which each industry, aided and abetted by the law and the public police force, seeks its success in the oppression of all the others?

Certes, si nous n’avions poursuivi qu’une modification immédiate des tarifs, si nous avions été, comme on l’a prétendu, les agents de quelques intérêts commerciaux, nous nous serions bien gardés d’inscrire sur notre drapeau un mot qui implique un principe. Croit-on que je n’aie pas pressenti les obstacles que nous susciterait cette déclaration de guerre à l’injustice? Ne savais-je pas très bien qu’en louvoyant, en cachant le but, en voilant la moitié de notre pensée, nous arriverions plus tôt à telle ou telle conquête partielle? Mais en quoi ces triomphes, d’ailleurs éphémères, eussent-ils dégagé et sauvegardé le grand principe de la Propriété, que nous aurions nous-mêmes tenu dans l’ombre et mis hors de cause? 

Certainly, if we had been working only for an immediate reduction in customs duties, if we had been, as has been alleged, the agents of certain commercial interests, we should have been very careful not to inscribe on our banner a word that implies a principle. Is it supposed that I did not foresee the obstacles that this declaration of war against injustice would place in our path? Did I not know very well that by evasive maneuvering, by hiding our aim, by veiling half our thought, we should the sooner achieve such or such a partial victory? But just how would these triumphs, actually ephemeral, have redeemed and safeguarded the great principle of property rights, which in that case we should ourselves have kept in the background and out of the discussion?

Je le répète, nous demandions l’abolition du régime protecteur, non comme une bonne mesure gouvernementale, mais comme une justice, comme la réalisation de la liberté, comme la conséquence rigoureuse d’un droit supérieur à la loi. Ce que nous voulions au fond, nous ne devions pas le dissimuler dans la forme.

 I repeat, we asked for the abolition of the protectionist system, not as a good governmental measure, but as an act of justice, as the realization of liberty, as the strict consequence of a right superior to the law. We should not conceal what we really want under a misleading form of expression.

Le temps approche où l’on reconnaîtra que nous avons eu raison de ne pas consentir à mettre, dans le titre de notre Association, un leurre, un piège, une surprise, une équivoque, mais la franche expression d’un principe éternel d’ordre et de justice, car il n’y a de puissance que dans les principes; eux seuls sont le flambeau des intelligences, le point de ralliement des convictions égarées.  

The time is coming when it will be recognized that we were right not to consent to put into the name of our Association a lure, a trap, a surprise, an equivocation, but rather the frank expression of an eternal principle of order and justice; for there is power only in principles: they alone are a beacon light for men’s minds, a rallying point for convictions gone astray.

Dans ces derniers temps, un tressaillement universel a parcouru, comme un frisson d’effroi, la France toute entière. Au seul mot de communisme, toutes les existences se sont alarmées. En voyant se produire au grand jour et presque officiellement les systèmes les plus étranges, en voyant se succéder des décrets subversifs, qui peuvent être suivis de décrets plus subversifs encore, chacun s’est demandé dans quelle voie nous marchions. Les capitaux se sont effrayés, le crédit a fui, le travail a été suspendu, la scie et le marteau se sont arrêtés au milieu de leur œuvre, comme si un funeste et universel courant électrique eût paralysé tout à coup les intelligences et les bras. Et pourquoi? Parce que le principe de la propriété, déjà compromis essentiellement par le régime protecteur, a éprouvé de nouvelles secousses, conséquences de la première; parce que l’intervention de la Loi en matière d’industrie, et comme moyen de pondérer les valeurs et d’équilibrer les richesses, intervention dont le régime protecteur a été la première manifestation, menace de se manifester sous mille formes connues ou inconnues. Oui, je le dis hautement, ce sont les propriétaires fonciers, ceux que l’on considère comme les propriétaires par excellence, qui ont ébranlé le principe de la propriété, puisqu’ils en ont appelé à la loi pour donner à leurs terres et à leurs produits une valeur factice. Ce sont les capitalistes qui ont suggéré l’idée du nivellement des fortunes par la loi. Le protectionnisme a été l’avant-coureur du communisme; je dis plus, il a été sa première manifestation. Car, que demandent aujourd’hui les classes souffrantes? Elles ne demandent pas autre chose que ce qu’ont demandé et obtenu les capitalistes et les propriétaires fonciers. Elles demandent l’intervention de la loi pour équilibrer, pondérer, égaliser la richesse. Ce qu’ils ont fait par la douane, elles veulent le faire par d’autres institutions; mais le principe est toujours le même, prendre législativement aux uns pour donner aux autres; et certes, puisque c’est vous, propriétaires et capitalistes, qui avez fait admettre ce funeste principe, ne vous récriez donc pas si de plus malheureux que vous en réclament le bénéfice. Ils y ont au moins un titre que vous n’aviez pas.

In recent times, a universal tremor has spread, like a shiver of fright, through all of France. At the mere mention of the word communism everyone becomes alarmed. Seeing the strangest systems emerge openly and almost officially, witnessing a continual succession of subversive decrees, and fearing that these may be followed by decrees even more subversive, everyone is wondering in what direction we are going. Capital is frightened, credit has taken flight, work has been suspended, the saw and the hammer have stopped in the midst of their labor, as if a disastrous electric current had suddenly paralyzed all men’s minds and hands. And why? Because the right to property, already essentially compromised by the protectionist system, has been subjected to new shocks consequent upon the first one; because the intervention of the law in matters of industry, as a means of stabilizing values and equilibrating incomes, an intervention of which the protectionist system has been the first known manifestation, now threatens to manifest itself in a thousand forms, known or unknown. Yes, I say it openly: it is the landowners, those who are considered property owners par excellence, who have undermined property rights, since they have appealed to the law to give an artificial value to their lands and their products. It is the capitalists who have suggested the idea of equalizing wealth by law. Protectionism has been the forerunner of communism; I say more: it has been its first manifestation. For what do the suffering classes demand today? They ask for nothing else than what the capitalists and landlords have demanded and obtained. They ask for the intervention of the law to achieve balance, equilibrium, equality in the distribution of wealth. What has been done in the first case by means of the tariff, they wish to do by other means, but the principle remains the same: Use the law to take from some to give to others; and certainly since it is you, landowners and capitalists, who have had this disastrous principle accepted, do not complain, then, if people less fortunate than you are claim its benefits. They at least have a claim to it that you do not.

Dans ces derniers temps, un tressaillement universel a parcouru, comme un frisson d’effroi, la France toute entière. Au seul mot de communisme, toutes les existences se sont alarmées. En voyant se produire au grand jour et presque officiellement les systèmes les plus étranges, en voyant se succéder des décrets subversifs, qui peuvent être suivis de décrets plus subversifs encore, chacun s’est demandé dans quelle voie nous marchions. Les capitaux se sont effrayés, le crédit a fui, le travail a été suspendu, la scie et le marteau se sont arrêtés au milieu de leur œuvre, comme si un funeste et universel courant électrique eût paralysé tout à coup les intelligences et les bras. Et pourquoi? Parce que le principe de la propriété, déjà compromis essentiellement par le régime protecteur, a éprouvé de nouvelles secousses, conséquences de la première; parce que l’intervention de la Loi en matière d’industrie, et comme moyen de pondérer les valeurs et d’équilibrer les richesses, intervention dont le régime protecteur a été la première manifestation, menace de se manifester sous mille formes connues ou inconnues. Oui, je le dis hautement, ce sont les propriétaires fonciers, ceux que l’on considère comme les propriétaires par excellence, qui ont ébranlé le principe de la propriété, puisqu’ils en ont appelé à la loi pour donner à leurs terres et à leurs produits une valeur factice. Ce sont les capitalistes qui ont suggéré l’idée du nivellement des fortunes par la loi. Le protectionnisme a été l’avant-coureur du communisme; je dis plus, il a été sa première manifestation. Car, que demandent aujourd’hui les classes souffrantes? Elles ne demandent pas autre chose que ce qu’ont demandé et obtenu les capitalistes et les propriétaires fonciers. Elles demandent l’intervention de la loi pour équilibrer, pondérer, égaliser la richesse. Ce qu’ils ont fait par la douane, elles veulent le faire par d’autres institutions; mais le principe est toujours le même, prendre législativement aux uns pour donner aux autres; et certes, puisque c’est vous, propriétaires et capitalistes, qui avez fait admettre ce funeste principe, ne vous récriez donc pas si de plus malheureux que vous en réclament le bénéfice. Ils y ont au moins un titre que vous n’aviez pas. Mais on ouvre les yeux enfin, on voit vers quel abîme nous pousse cette première atteinte portée aux conditions essentielles de toute sécurité sociale. N’est-ce pas une terrible leçon, une preuve sensible de cet enchaînement de causes et d’effets, par lequel apparût à la longue la justice des rétributions providentielles, que de voir aujourd’hui les riches s’épouvanter devant l’envahissement d’une fausse doctrine, dont ils ont eux-mêmes posé les bases iniques, et dont ils croyaient faire paisiblement tourner les conséquences à leur seul profit? Oui, prohibitionnistes, vous avez été les promoteurs du communisme. Oui, propriétaires, vous avez détruit dans les esprits la vraie notion de la Propriété.  

But finally people’s eyes are beginning to open, and they see the nature of the abyss toward which we are being driven because of this first violation of the conditions essential to all social stability. Is it not a terrible lesson, a tangible proof of the existence of that chain of causes and effects whereby the justice of providential retribution ultimately becomes apparent, to see the rich terrified today by the inroads made by a false doctrine of which they themselves laid the iniquitous foundations, and whose consequences they believed they could quietly turn to their own profit? Yes, protectionists, you have been the promoters of communism. Yes, property owners, you have destroyed the true idea of property in our minds.

Cette notion, c’est l’Économie politique qui la donne, et vous avez proscrit l’Économie politique, parce que, au nom du droit de propriété, elle combattait vos injustes privilèges. — Et quand elles ont saisi le pouvoir, quelle a été aussi la première pensée de ces écoles modernes qui vous effraient? c’est de supprimer l’Économie politique, car la science économique, c’est une protestation perpétuelle contre ce nivellement légal que vous avez recherché et que d’autres recherchent aujourd’hui à votre exemple. Vous avez demandé à la Loi autre chose et plus qu’il ne faut demander à la Loi, autre chose et plus que la Loi ne peut donner. Vous lui avez demandé, non la sécurité (c’eût été votre droit), mais la plus-value de ce qui vous appartient, ce qui ne pouvait vous être accordé sans porter atteinte aux droits d’autrui. Et maintenant, la folie de vos prétentions est devenue la folie universelle. — Et si vous voulez conjurer l’orage qui menace de vous engloutir, il ne vous reste qu’une ressource. Reconnaissez votre erreur; renoncez à vos privilèges; faites rentrer la Loi dans ses attributions; renfermez le Législateur dans son rôle. Vous nous avez délaissés, vous nous avez attaqués, parce que vous ne nous compreniez pas sans doute. À l’aspect de l’abîme que vous avez ouvert de vos propres mains, hâtez-vous de vous rallier à nous, dans notre propagande en faveur du droit de propriété, en donnant, je le répète, à ce mot sa signification la plus large, en y comprenant et les facultés de l’homme et tout ce qu’elles parviennent à produire, qu’il s’agisse de travail ou d’échange!  

It was political economy that gave us this idea, and you have proscribed political economy, because in the name of the right to property it opposes your unjust privileges. And when the adherents of these new schools of thought that frighten you came to power, what was the first thing they tried to do? To suppress political economy, for political economy is a perpetual protest against the legal leveling which you have sought, and which others, following your example, seek today. You have demanded of the law something other and more than should be asked of the law, something other and more than the law can give. You have asked of it, not security (that would have been your right), but a surplus value over and above what belongs to you, which could not be accorded to you without violating the rights of others. And now, the folly of your claims has become a universal folly. And if you wish to ward off the storm that threatens to destroy you, you have only one recourse left. Recognize your error; renounce your privileges; let the law return to its proper sphere, and restrict the legislator to his proper role. You have abandoned us, you have attacked us, because you undoubtedly did not understand us. Now that you perceive the abyss that you have opened with your own hands, hasten to join us in our defense of the right to property by giving to this term its broadest possible meaning and showing that it includes both man’s faculties and all that his faculties can produce, whether by labor or by exchange.

La doctrine que nous défendons excite une certaine défiance, à raison de son extrême simplicité; elle se borne à demander à la loi Sécurité pour tous. On a de la peine à croire que le mécanisme gouvernemental puisse être réduit à ces proportions. De plus, comme cette doctrine renferme la Loi dans les limites de la Justice universelle, on lui reproche d’exclure la Fraternité. L’Économie politique n’accepte pas l’accusation. Ce sera l’objet d’un prochain article. 

The doctrine which we are defending arouses a certain opposition because of its extreme simplicity; it confines itself to demanding of the law security for all. People can scarcely believe that the machinery of government can be reduced to these proportions. Moreover, as this doctrine restricts the law to the limits of universal justice, it is reproached for excluding fraternity. Political economy does not accept this accusation. This will be the subject of a forthcoming article.  NOTES TO CHAPTER 3: Article printed in the May 15, 1848, issue of the Journal des économistes. –EDITOR.Propriété et Loi: Frédéric Bastiat. http://bastiat.org/La confiance de mes concitoyens m’a revêtu du titre de législateur . 

The confidence of my fellow citizens has invested me with the title of legislator. Ce titre, je l’aurais certes décliné, si je l’avais compris comme faisait Rousseau. I should certainly have declined that title if I had understood it as Rousseau did. Celui qui ose entreprendre d’instituer un peuple, dit-il, doit se sentir en état de changer, pour ainsi dire, la nature humaine, de transformer chaque individu qui, par lui-même, est un tout parfait et solitaire, en partie d’un plus grand tout dont cet individu reçoive en quelque sorte sa vie et son être; d’altérer la constitution physique de l’homme pour la renforcer, etc., etc… S’il est vrai qu’un grand prince est un homme rare, que sera-ce d’un grand législateur? Le premier n’a qu’à suivre le modèle que l’autre doit proposer. Celui-ci est le mécanicien qui invente la machine, celui-là n’est que l’ouvrier qui la monte et la fait marcher. »

Whoever ventures to undertake the founding of a nation,” he says, should feel himself capable of changing human nature, so to speak; of transforming each individual, who by himself is a perfect and separate whole, into a part of a greater whole, from which that individual somehow receives his life and his being; of changing the physical constitution of man in order to strengthen it, etc., etc … If it be true that a great prince is a rarity, what, then, is to be said of a great law- giver? The first has only to follow the model that the other constructs. The latter is the artificer who invents the machine; the former is only the operator who turns it on and runs it.

Rousseau, étant convaincu que l’état social était d’invention humaine, devait placer très haut la loi et le législateur. Entre le législateur et le reste des hommes, il voyait la distance ou plutôt l’abîme qui sépare le mécanicien de la matière inerte dont la machine est composée.  

Rousseau, being convinced that society is a human contrivance, found it necessary to place law and the lawgiver on an extremely lofty elevation. He saw between the lawgiver and the rest of mankind as great a distance, or rather as great a gulf, as that which separates the inventor of the machine from the inert matter of which it is composed.

Selon lui, la loi devait transformer les personnes, créer ou ne créer pas la propriété. Selon moi, la société, les personnes et les propriétés existent antérieurement aux lois, et, pour me renfermer dans un sujet spécial, je dirai: Ce n’est pas parce qu’il y a des lois qu’il y a des propriétés, mais parce qu’il y a des propriétés qu’il y a des lois. 

In his opinion, the law should transform persons and should create or not create property. In my opinion, society, persons, and property exist prior to the law, and–to restrict myself specifically to the last of these–I would say: Property does not exist because there are laws, but laws exist because there is property.

L’opposition de ces deux systèmes est radicale. Les conséquences qui en dérivent vont s’éloignant sans cesse; qu’il me soit donc permis de bien préciser la question. 

The opposition between these two systems is fundamental. Since the consequences that follow from them keep eluding us, I hope I may be permitted to make the question very precise.

J’avertis d’abord que je prends le mot propriété dans le sens général, et non au sens restreint de propriété foncière. Je regrette, et probablement tous les économistes regrettent avec moi, que ce mot réveille involontairement en nous l’idée de la possession du sol. J’entends par propriété le droit qu’a le travailleur sur la valeur qu’il a créée par son travail. 

First, let me state that I use the word property in the general sense, and not in the limited sense of landed property. I regret, and probably all economists regret with me, that this word involuntarily evokes in us the idea of the possession of land. By property I understand the right that the worker has to the value that he has created by his labor.

Cela posé, je me demande si ce droit est de création légale, ou s’il n’est pas au contraire antérieur et supérieur à la loi? S’il a fallu que la loi vint donner naissance au droit de propriété, ou si, au contraire, la propriété était un fait et un droit préexistants qui ont donné naissance à la loi? Dans le premier cas, le législateur a pour mission d’organiser, modifier, supprimer même la propriété, s’il le trouve bon; dans le second, ses attributions se bornent à la garantir, à la faire respecter.  

Now, this much granted, I ask whether this right is created by, law, or whether it is not, on the contrary, prior and superior to the law; whether law is needed to give rise to the right to property, or whether, on the contrary, property is a pre-existing fact and right that gave rise to law. In the first case, it is the function of the legislator to organize, modify, and even eliminate property if he deems it good to do so; in the second, his jurisdiction is limited to guaranteeing and safeguarding property rights.

Dans le préambule d’un projet de constitution publié par un des plus grands penseurs des temps modernes, M. Lamennais, je lis ces mots: 

In the preamble to a draft for a constitution, published by one of the greatest thinkers of modern times, M. de Lamennais [Felicite de Lamennais (1782-1854), French philosopher, Catholic priest, reformer, and ardent champion of the working classes.–TRANSLATOR.] I find the following words: 

“Le peuple déclare qu’il reconnaît des droits et des devoirs antérieurs et supérieurs à toutes les lois positives et indépendants d’elles. Ces droits et ces devoirs, directement émanés de Dieu, se résument dans le triple dogme qu’expriment ces mots sacrés: Égalité, Liberté, Fraternité. 

The people declare that they recognize rights and duties prior and superior to all positive laws and independent of them. These rights and duties, emanating directly from God, are summed up in the triple dogma which these sacred words express: Equality, Liberty, Fraternity.

Je me demande si le droit de Propriété n’est pas un de ceux qui, bien loin de dériver de la loi positive, précédent la loi et sont sa raison d’être? Ce n’est pas, comme on pourrait le croire, une question subtile et oiseuse. Elle est immense, elle est fondamentale.  

I ask whether the right to property is not one of those rights which, far from springing from positive law, are prior to the law and are the reason for its existence. This is not, as might be thought, a theoretical and idle question. It is of tremendous, of fundamental importance. Its solution concerns society most urgently, and the reader will be convinced of this, I hope, after I have compared the two systems in question in regard to their origin and their consequences.

Sa solution intéresse au plus haut degré la société, et l’on en sera convaincu, j’espère, quand j’aurai comparé, dans leur origine et par leurs effets, les deux systèmes en présence. Les économistes pensent que la Propriété est un fait providentiel comme la Personne. Le Code ne donne pas l’existence à l’une plus qu’à l’autre. La Propriété est une conséquence nécessaire de la constitution de l’homme. 

Economists believe that property is a providential fact, like the human person. The law does not bring the one into existence any more than it does the other. Property is a necessary consequence of the nature of man.

Man, too, lives and develops by appropriation. Appropriation is a natural phenomenon, providential and essential to life; and property is only appropriation that labor has made a right. When labor has rendered substances assimilable and appropriable that were not so before, I do not really see how it can be alleged that, by right, the act of appropriation should be performed for the benefit of another individual than the one who has done the work.

C’est en raison de ces faits primordiaux, conséquences nécessaires de la constitution même de l’homme, que la Loi intervient. Comme l’aspiration vers la vie et le développement peut porter l’homme fort à dépouiller l’homme faible, et à violer ainsi le droit du travail, il a été convenu que la force de tous serait consacrée à prévenir et réprimer la violence. La mission de la Loi est donc de faire respecter la Propriété. Ce n’est pas la Propriété qui est conventionnelle, mais la Loi. 

It is because of these primordial facts, which are necessary consequences of the very nature of man, that the law intervenes. As the desire for life and self-development can induce the strong man to despoil the weak, and thus to violate his right to the fruits of his labor, it has been agreed that the combined force of all members of society should be devoted to preventing and repressing violence. The function of the law, then, is to safeguard the right to property. It is not property that is a matter of agreement, but law.

Recherchons maintenant l’origine du système opposé. Let us now seek for the origin of the opposing system.  Toutes nos constitutions passées proclament que la Propriété est sacrée, ce qui semble assigner pour but à l’association commune le libre développement, soit des individualités, soit des associations particulières, par le travail. Ceci implique que la Propriété est un droit antérieur à la Loi, puisque la Loi n’aurait pour objet que de garantir la Propriété.

All our past constitutions proclaim that property is sacred, a fact that seems to indicate that the goal of social organization is the free development of private associations or individuals through their labor. This implies that the right to property is prior to the law, since the sole object of the law would be to protect property. 

Mais je me demande si cette déclaration n’a pas été introduite dans nos chartes pour ainsi dire instinctivement, à titre de phraséologie, de lettre morte, et si surtout elle est au fond de toutes les convictions sociales? But I wonder whether such a declaration has not been introduced into our constitutions instinctively, so to speak, as a mere pious phrase, as a dead letter, and whether, above all, it underlies all our social convictions.

Or, s’il est vrai, comme on l’a dit, que la littérature soit l’expression de la société, il est permis de concevoir des doutes à cet égard; car jamais, certes, les publicistes, après avoir respectueusement salué le principe de la propriété, n’ont autant invoqué l’intervention de la loi, non pour faire respecter la Propriété, mais pour modifier, altérer, transformer, équilibrer, pondérer, et organiser la propriété, le crédit et le travail.

Now, if it is true, as has been said, that literature is the expression of society, doubts may well be raised in this regard; for never, certainly, have political theorists, after having respectfully saluted the principle of property, invoked so much the intervention of the law, not to safeguard property rights, but to modify, impair, transform, balance, equalize, and organize property, credit, and labor.

Or, ceci suppose qu’on attribue à la Loi, et par suite au Législateur, une puissance absolue sur les personnes et les propriétés. 

Now, this supposes that an absolute power over persons and property is imputed to the law, and hence to the legislator.

Nous pouvons en être affligés, nous ne devons pas en être surpris.  T

his may distress us, but it should not surprise us.

Où puisons-nous nos idées sur ces matières et jusqu’à la notion du Droit? Dans les livres latins, dans le Droit romain. 

Whence do we derive our ideas on these matters, and even our very notion of rights? From Latin literature and Roman law.

Je n’ai pas fait mon Droit, mais il me suffit de savoir que c’est là la source de nos théories, pour affirmer qu’elles sont fausses.  I have not studied law, but it is sufficient for me to know that the source of our theories is in Roman law, to affirm that they are false.

Les Romains devaient considérer la Propriété comme un fait purement conventionnel, comme un produit, comme une création artificielle de la Loi écrite. Évidemment, ils ne pouvaient, ainsi que le fait l’économie politique, remonter jusqu’à la constitution même de l’homme, et apercevoir le rapport et l’enchaînement nécessaire qui existent entre ces phénomènes: besoins, facultés, travail, propriété. C’eût été un contresens et un suicide. Comment eux, qui vivaient de rapine, dont toutes les propriétés étaient le fruit de la spoliation, qui avaient fondé leurs moyens d’existence sur le labeur des esclaves, comment auraient-ils pu, sans ébranler les fondements de leur société, introduire dans la législation cette pensée que le vrai titre de la propriété, c’est le travail qui l’a produite? Non, ils ne pouvaient ni le dire, ni le penser. Ils devaient avoir recours à cette définition empirique de la propriété, jus utendi et abutendi, définition qui n’a de relation qu’avec les effets, et non avec les causes, non avec les origines; car les origines, ils étaient bien forcés de les tenir dans l’ombre.  

The Romans could not fail to consider property anything but a purely conventional fact–a product, an artificial creation, of written law. Evidently they could not go back, as political economy does, to the very nature of man and perceive the relations and necessary connections that exist among wants, faculties, labor, and property. It would have been absurd and suicidal for them to have done so. How could they, when they lived by looting, when all their property was the fruit of plunder, when they had based their whole way of life on the labor of slaves; how could they, without shattering the foundations of their society, introduce into their legislation the idea that the true title to property is the labor that produces it? No, they could neither say it nor think it. They had to have recourse to a purely empirical definition of property — jus utendi et abutendi– a definition that refers only to effects and not to causes or origins, for they were indeed forced to conceal the latter from view.

Il est triste de penser que la science du Droit, chez nous, au dix-neuvième siècle, en est encore aux idées que la présence de l’Esclavage avait dû susciter dans l’antiquité; mais cela s’explique. L’enseignement du Droit est monopolisé en France, et le monopole exclut le progrès. 

It is sad to think that the science of law as we know it in the nineteenth century is still based on principles formulated in antiquity to justify slavery; but this is easily explained. The teaching of law is monopolized in France, and monopoly excludes progress.

Il est vrai que les juristes ne font pas toute l’opinion publique; mais il faut dire que l’éducation universitaire et cléricale prépare merveilleusement la jeunesse française à recevoir, sur ces matières, les fausses notions des juristes, puisque, comme pour mieux s’en assurer, elle nous plonge tous, pendant les dix plus belles années de notre vie, dans cette atmosphère de guerre et d’esclavage qui enveloppait et pénétrait la société romaine. 

It is true that jurists do not create all of public opinion; but it must be said that university and clerical education prepares French youth marvelously to accept the false ideas of jurists on these matters, since, the better to assure this, it plunges all of us, during the ten best years of our lives, in the atmosphere of war and slavery that enveloped and permeated Roman society.

Ne soyons donc pas surpris de voir se reproduire, dans le dix-huitième siècle, cette idée romaine que la propriété est un fait conventionnel et d’institution légale; que, bien loin que la Loi soit un corollaire de la Propriété, c’est la Propriété qui est un corollaire de la Loi. On sait que, selon Rousseau, non seulement la propriété, mais la société toute entière était le résultat d’un contrat, d’une invention née dans la tête du Législateur. 

Do not be surprised, then, to see reproduced in the eighteenth century the Roman idea that property is a matter of convention and of legal institution; that, far from law being a corollary of property, it is property that is a corollary of law. We know that, for Rousseau, not only property but the whole of society was the result of a contract, of an invention, a product of the legislator’s mind.

L’ordre social est un droit sacré qui sert de base à tous les autres. Cependant ce droit ne vient point de la nature. Il est donc fondé sur les conventions.  

The social order is a sacred right that serves as the basis of all the others. However, this right does not come from Nature. Therefore, it is founded on convention.

Ainsi le droit qui sert de base à tous les autres est purement conventionnel. Donc la propriété, qui est un droit postérieur, est conventionnelle aussi. Elle ne vient pas de la nature. 

Thus, the right that serves as the basis of all the others is purely conventional. Hence, property, which is a subsequent right, is also conventional. It does not come from Nature.

Robespierre était imbu des idées de Rousseau. Dans ce que dit l’élève sur la propriété, on reconnaîtra les théories et jusqu’aux formes oratoires du maître.

Robespierre was imbued with the ideas of Rousseau. In what the disciple says about property, we recognize the theories and even the rhetorical forms of the master.

Citoyens, je vous proposerai d’abord quelques articles nécessaires pour compléter votre théorie de la propriété. Que ce mot n’alarme personne. Âmes de boue, qui n’estimez que l’or, je ne veux pas toucher à vos trésors, quelque impure qu’en soit la source… Pour moi, j’aimerais mieux être né dans la cabane de Fabricius que dans le palais de Lucullus, etc., etc.

Citizens, I propose to you first a few necessary articles to complete our theory of property. Let this word alarm no one. You sordid souls, who esteem only gold, do not be frightened; I do not wish to lay hands on your treasures, however impure their source … For my part, I would rather be born in the hut of Fabricius than in the palace of Lucullus, etc., etc.

Je ferai observer ici que, lorsqu’on analyse la notion de propriété, il est irrationnel et dangereux de faire de ce mot le synonyme d’opulence, et surtout d’opulence mal acquise.  Here it should be noted that, when one analyzes the notion of property, it is irrational and dangerous to treat this term as synonymous with opulence, and, even worse, with ill-gotten opulence.

La chaumière de Fabricius est une propriété aussi bien que le palais de Lucullus. Mais qu’il me soit permis d’appeler l’attention du lecteur sur la phrase suivante, qui renferme tout le système: The hut of Fabricius [Gaius Luscinus Fabricius, distinguished Roman general and consul] is property just as much as the palace of Lucullus. But let me call the reader’s attention to the following words, which sum up the whole system.

En définissant la liberté, ce premier besoin de l’homme, le plus sacré des droits qu’il tient de la nature, nous avons dit, avec raison, qu’elle avait pour limite le droit d’autrui. Pourquoi n’avez-vous pas appliqué ce principe à la propriété, qui est une institution sociale, comme si les lois éternelles de la nature étaient moins inviolables que les conventions des hommes?  

In defining freedom, man’s primary need, the most sacred of his natural rights, we have said, quite correctly, that it has as its limit the rights of others. Why have you not applied this principle to property, which is socially instituted, as if the eternal laws of Nature were less inviolable than the conventions of men?

Après ces préambules, Robespierre établit les principes en ces termes: After these introductory remarks, Robespierre formulates his principles in these terms: 

Art, 1er. La propriété est le droit qu’a chaque citoyen de jouir et de disposer de la portion de biens qui lui est garantie par la loi.  

Art. 1. Property is the right that each citizen has to enjoy and to dispose of the portion of goods that is guaranteed to him by law.

Art. 2. Le droit de propriété est borné, comme tous les autres, par l’obligation de respecter les droits d’autrui. 

Art. The right to property is limited, as are all others, by the obligation to respect the rights of others.

Ainsi Robespierre met en opposition la Liberté et la Propriété. Ce sont deux droits d’origine différente: l’un vient de la nature, l’autre est d’institution sociale. Le premier est naturel, le second conventionnel.

Thus, Robespierre sets up an opposition between liberty and property. These are two rights of different origin: one comes from Nature; the other is socially instituted. The first is natural; the second, conventional. 

Quoi qu’il en soit, il est certain que Robespierre, à l’exemple de Rousseau, considérait la propriété comme une institution sociale, comme une convention. Il ne la rattachait nullement à son véritable titre, qui est le travail. C’est le droit, disait-il, de disposer de la portion de biens garantie par la loi. Je n’ai pas besoin de rappeler ici qu’à travers Rousseau et Robespierre la notion romaine sur la propriété s’est transmise à toutes nos écoles dites socialistes. On sait que le premier volume de Louis Blanc, sur la Révolution, est un dithyrambe au philosophe de Genève et au chef de la Convention. 

The fact that Robespierre imposes identical limits on these two rights should have led him, it would seem, to think that they come from the same source. Whether liberty or property is in question, to respect the right of others is not to destroy or impair the right, but rather to recognize and confirm it. It is precisely because property as well as liberty is a right prior to the law that both exist only on condition of respecting the like right of others, and it is the function of the law to see that this limit is respected, which means to recognize and support this very principle.

Ainsi, cette idée que le droit de propriété est d’institution sociale, qu’il est une invention du législateur, une création de la loi, en d’autres termes, qu’il est inconnu à l’homme dans l’état de nature, cette idée, dis-je, s’est transmise des Romains jusqu’à nous, à travers l’enseignement du droit, les études classiques, les publicistes du dix-huitième siècle, les révolutionnaires de 93, et les modernes organisateurs. On sait que, selon Rousseau, non seulement la propriété, mais la société toute entière était le résultat d’un contrat, d’une invention née dans la tête du Législateur. Quoi qu’il en soit, il est certain que Robespierre, à l’exemple de Rousseau, considérait la propriété comme une institution sociale, comme une convention.

 In any case, it is certain that Robespierre, following Rousseau’s example, considered property as a social institution, as a convention. He did not connect it at all with its true justification, which is labor. It is the right, he said, to dispose of the portion of goods guaranteed by law.

C’est le droit, disait-il, de disposer de la portion de biens garantie par la loi. Je n’ai pas besoin de rappeler ici qu’à travers Rousseau et Robespierre la notion romaine sur la propriété s’est transmise à toutes nos écoles dites socialistes. On sait que le premier volume de Louis Blanc, sur la Révolution, est un dithyrambe au philosophe de Genève et au chef de la Convention. I do not need to recall here that through Rousseau and Robespierre the Roman idea of property has been transmitted to all our self-styled socialist schools of thought. We know that the first volume of Louis Blanc, on the Revolution, is a dithyramb to the philosopher of Geneva and to the leader of the Convention. Thus, this idea that the right to property is socially instituted, that it is an invention of the legislator, a creation of the law–in other words, that it is unknown to men in the state of nature– has been transmitted from the Romans down to us, through the teaching of law, classical studies, the political theorists of the eighteenth century, the revolutionaries of 1793, and the modem proponents of a planned social order.

Parmi ces projets, ceux qui ont les plus attiré l’attention publique sont ceux de Fourier, de Saint-Simon, d’Owen, de Cabet, de Louis Blanc. Mais ce serait folie de croire qu’il n’y a que ces cinq modes possibles d’organisation. Le nombre en est illimité. Chaque matin peut en faire éclore un nouveau, plus séduisant que celui de la veille, et je laisse à penser ce qu’il adviendrait de l’humanité si, alors qu’une de ces inventions lui serait imposée, il s’en révélait tout à coup une autre plus spécieuse. Elle serait réduite à l’alternative ou de changer tous les matins son mode d’existence, ou de persévérer à tout jamais dans une voie reconnue fausse, par cela seul qu’elle y serait une fois entrée. 

Among these proposals, the ones that have attracted the most public attention are those of Fourier, Saint-Simon, Owen, Cabet, and Louis Blanc. But it would be absurd to believe that these five modes of organization are the only ones possible. There are an unlimited number of them. Each morning a new one may appear, more seductive than that of the day before, and I leave it to your imagination to envision what would become of mankind if, as soon as one of these plans were imposed on us, another more plausible were suddenly to make its appearance. Mankind would be reduced to the alternative either of changing its mode of life every morning, or of persevering forever along a road recognized as false, simply because it had already been entered upon.

Une seconde conséquence est d’exciter chez tous les rêveurs la soif du pouvoir. J’imagine une organisation du travail. Exposer mon système et attendre que les hommes l’adoptent s’il est bon, ce serait supposer que le principe d’action est en eux. Mais dans le système que j’examine, le principe d’action réside dans le Législateur. « Le législateur, comme dit Rousseau, doit se sentir de force à transformer la nature humaine. » Donc, ce à quoi je dois aspirer, c’est à devenir législateur afin d’imposer l’ordre social de mon invention. 

A second result is to arouse in all these dreamers a thirst for power. Suppose I conceive of a system for the organization of labor. To set forth my system and wait for men to adopt it if it is good, would be to assume that the initiative lies with them. But in the system that I am examining, the initiative lies with the legislator. “The legislator,” as Rousseau says, “should feel strong enough to transform human nature.” Hence, what I should aspire to is to become a legislator, in order to impose on mankind a social order of my own invention.
Il est clair encore que les systèmes qui ont pour base cette idée que le droit de propriété est d’institution sociale, aboutissent tous ou au privilège le plus concentré, ou au communisme le plus intégral, selon les mauvaises ou les bonnes intentions de l’inventeur. S’il a des desseins sinistres, il se servira de la loi pour enrichir quelques-uns aux dépens de tous. S’il obéit à des sentiments philanthropiques, il voudra égaliser le bien-être, et, pour cela, il pensera à stipuler en faveur de chacun une participation légale et uniforme aux produits créés. Reste à savoir si, dans cette donnée, la création des produits est possible.

Moreover, it is clear that the systems which are based on the idea that the right to property is socially instituted all end either in the most concentrated privilege or in complete communism, depending upon the evil or good intentions of the inventor. If his purposes are sinister, he will make use of the law to enrich a few at the expense of all. If he is philanthropically inclined, he will try to equalize the standard of living, and, to that end, he will devise some means of assuring everyone a legal claim to an equal share in whatever is produced. It remains to be seen whether, in that case, it is possible to produce anything at all. À cet égard, le Luxembourg nous a présenté récemment un spectacle fort extraordinaire. N’a-t-on pas entendu, en plein dix-neuvième siècle, quelques jours après la révolution de Février, faite au nom de la liberté, un homme plus qu’un ministre, un membre du gouvernement provisoire, un fonctionnaire revêtu d’une autorité révolutionnaire et illimitée, demander froidement si, dans la répartition des salaires, il était bon d’avoir égard à la force, au talent, à l’activité, à l’habileté de l’ouvrier, c’est-à-dire à la richesse produite; ou bien si, ne tenant aucun compte de ces vertus personnelles, ni de leur effet utile, il ne vaudrait pas mieux donner à tous désormais une rémunération uniforme? Question qui revient à celle-ci: Un mètre de drap porté sur le marché par un paresseux se vendra-t-il pour le même prix que deux mètres offerts par un homme laborieux? Et, chose, qui passe toute croyance, cet homme a proclamé qu’il préférait l’uniformité des profits, quel que fût le travail offert en vente, et il a décidé ainsi, dans sa sagesse, que, quoique deux soient deux par nature, ils ne seraient plus qu’un de par la loi. In this regard, the Luxembourg [The meeting-place of the National Assembly has recently presented us with a most extraordinary spectacle. Did we not hear, right in the middle of the nineteenth century, a few days after the February Revolution (a revolution made in the name of liberty) a man, more than a cabinet minister, actually a member of the provisional government, a public official vested with revolutionary and unlimited authority, coolly inquire whether in the allotment of wages it was good to consider the strength, the talent, the industriousness, the capability of the worker, that is, the wealth he produced; or whether, in disregard of these personal virtues or of their useful effect, it would not be better to give everyone henceforth a uniform remuneration? This is tantamount to asking: Will a yard of cloth brought to market by an idler sell at the same price as two yards offered by an industrious man? And, what passes all belief, this same individual proclaimed that he would prefer profits to be uniform, whatever the quality or the quantity of the product offered for sale, and he therefore decided in his wisdom that, although two are two by nature, they are to be no more than one by law.

Voilà où l’on arrive quand on part de ce point que la loi est plus forte que la nature. This is where we get when we start from the assumption that the law is stronger than nature.

L’auditoire, à ce qu’il paraît, a compris que la constitution même de l’homme se révoltait contre un tel arbitraire; que jamais on ne ferait qu’un mètre de drap donnât droit à la même rémunération que deux mètres. Que s’il en était ainsi, la concurrence qu’on veut anéantir serait remplacée par une autre concurrence mille fois plus funeste; que chacun ferait à qui travaillerait moins, à qui déploierait la moindre activité, puisque aussi bien, de par la loi, la récompense serait toujours garantie et égale pour tous. Those whom he addressed apparently understood that such arbitrariness is repugnant to the very nature of man, that one yard of cloth could never be made to give the right to the same remuneration as two yards. In such a case, the competition that was to be abolished would be replaced by another competition a thousand times worse: each worker would strive to be the one who worked the least, who exerted himself the least, since, by law, the wage would always be guaranteed and would be the same for all.

Mais le citoyen Blanc avait prévu l’objection, et, pour prévenir ce doux farniente, hélas! si naturel à l’homme, quand le travail n’est pas rémunéré, il a imaginé de faire dresser dans chaque commune un poteau où seraient inscrits les noms des paresseux. Mais il n’a pas dit s’il y aurait des inquisiteurs pour découvrir le péché de paresse, des tribunaux pour le juger, et des gendarmes pour exécuter la sentence. Il est à remarquer que les utopistes ne se préoccupent jamais de l’immense machine gouvernementale, qui peut seule mettre en mouvement leur mécanique légale. But Citizen [This title of address used during the French Revolution has. of course, an ironic connotation here, much like the term “Comrade” in our time. Blanc had foreseen this objection, and, to prevent this dolce far niente so natural in man, alas! when his work is not remunerated, he thought of the idea of erecting in each community a post where the names of the idlers would be inscribed. But he did not say whether there would be inquisitors to spy out the sin of laziness, tribunals to judge it, and police to carry out the sentence. It is to be noted that the utopians are never concerned with the vast governmental apparatus that alone can set their legal mechanism in motion.

Comme les délégués du Luxembourg se montraient quelque peu incrédules, est apparu le citoyen Vidal, secrétaire du citoyen Blanc, qui a achevé la pensée du maître. À l’exemple de Rousseau, le citoyen Vidal ne se propose rien moins que de changer la nature de l’homme et les lois de la Providence. When the delegates of the Luxembourg appeared a bit incredulous, up strode Citizen Vidal, [Francois Vidal, journalist, politician, and writer on economic subjects. An ardent advocate of government intervention in the relations between labor and capital, he edited a number of publications, including La Presse.

Il a plu à la Providence de placer dans l’individu les besoins et leurs conséquences, les facultés et leurs conséquences, créant ainsi l’intérêt personnel, autrement dit, l’instinct de la conservation et l’amour du développement comme le grand ressort de l’humanité. M. Vidal va changer tout cela. Il a regardé l’œuvre de Dieu, et il a vu qu’elle n’était pas bonne. En conséquence, partant de ce principe que la loi et le législateur peuvent tout, il va supprimer, par décret, l’intérêt personnel. Il y substitue le point d’honneur. Ce n’est plus pour vivre, faire vivre et élever leur famille que les hommes travailleront, mais pour obéir au point d’honneur, pour éviter le fatal poteau, comme si ce nouveau mobile n’était pas encore de l’intérêt personnel d’une autre espèce. It has pleased Providence to give to every individual certain wants and their consequences, as well as certain faculties and their consequences, thus creating self-interest, otherwise known as the instinct for self- preservation and the desire for self-development, as the great motive force of mankind. M. Vidal is going to change all this. He has looked at the work of God, and he has seen that it was not good. Consequently, proceeding from the principle that the law and the legislator can do everything, he is going to suppress self-interest by decree. He substitutes for it the code of honor. It is no longer in order to live or to raise and support their families that men are to work, but to maintain their honor, to avoid the fatal post, as if this new motive were not again self-interest of another sort.

M. Vidal cite sans cesse ce que le point d’honneur fait faire aux armées. Mais, hélas! il faut tout dire, et si l’on veut enrégimenter les travailleurs, qu’on nous dise donc si le Code militaire, avec ses trente cas de peine de mort, deviendra le Code des ouvriers? 

Vidal keeps incessantly citing what adherence to a code of honor has made armies do. But, alas! let him tell us the whole truth, and if his plan is to regiment the workers, let him say, then, whether martial law, with its thirty crimes punishable by death, is to become the code of labor.

Un effet plus frappant encore du principe funeste que je m’efforce ici de combattre, c’est l’incertitude qu’il tient toujours suspendue, comme l’épée de Damoclès, sur le travail, le capital, le commerce et l’industrie; et ceci est si grave que j’ose réclamer toute l’attention du lecteur. 

An even more striking effect of the harmful principle that I am here seeking to combat is the uncertainty that it always holds suspended, like the sword of Damocles, over labor, capital, commerce, and industry; and this is so serious that I venture to ask the reader to give his full attention to it.

Dans un pays, comme aux États-Unis, où l’on place le droit de Propriété au-dessus de la Loi, où la force publique n’a pour mission que de faire respecter ce droit naturel, chacun peut en toute confiance consacrer à la production son capital et ses bras. Il n’a pas à craindre que ses plans et ses combinaisons soient d’un instant à l’autre bouleversés par la puissance législative. 

In a country like the United States, where the right to property is placed above the law, where the sole function of the public police force is to safeguard this natural right, each person can in full confidence dedicate his capital and his labor to production. He does not have to fear that his plans and calculations will be upset from one instant to another by the legislature.

Mais quand, au contraire, posant en principe que ce n’est pas le travail, mais la Loi qui est le fondement de la Propriété, on admet tous les faiseurs d’utopies à imposer leurs combinaisons, d’une manière générale et par l’autorité des décrets, qui ne voit qu’on tourne contre le progrès industriel tout ce que la nature a mis de prévoyance et de prudence dans le cœur de l’homme? 

But when, on the contrary, acting on the principle that not labor, but the law, is the basis of property, we permit the makers of utopias to impose their schemes on us in a general way and by decree, who does not see that all the foresight and prudence that Nature has implanted in the heart of man is turned against industrial progress?

Quel est en ce moment le hardi spéculateur qui oserait monter une usine ou se livrer à une entreprise? Hier on décrète qu’il ne sera permis de travailler que pendant un nombre d’heure déterminé. Aujourd’hui on décrète que le salaire de tel genre de travail sera fixé; qui peut prévoir le décret de demain, celui d’après-demain, ceux des jours suivants? Une fois que le législateur se place à cette distance incommensurable des autres hommes; qu’il croit, en toute conscience, pouvoir disposer de leur temps, de leur travail, de leurs transactions, toutes choses qui sont des Propriétés, quel homme, sur la surface du pays, a la moindre connaissance de la position forcée où la Loi le placera demain, lui et sa profession? Et, dans de telles conditions, qui peut et veut rien entreprendre?

Where, at such a time, is the bold speculator who would dare set up a factory or engage in an enterprise? Yesterday it was decreed that he will be permitted to work only for a fixed number of hours. Today it is decreed that the wages of a certain type of labor will be fixed. Who can foresee tomorrow’s decree, that of the day after tomorrow, or those of the days following? Once the legislator is placed at this incommensurable distance from other men, and believes, in all conscience, that he can dispose of their time, their labor, and their transactions, all of which are their property, what man in the whole country has the least knowledge of the position in which the law will forcibly place him and his line of work tomorrow? And, under such conditions, who can or will undertake anything?

Je ne nie certes pas que, parmi les innombrables systèmes que ce faux principe fait éclore, un grand nombre, le plus grand nombre même ne partent d’intentions bienveillantes et généreuses. Mais ce qui est redoutable, c’est le principe lui-même. Le but manifeste de chaque combinaison particulière est d’égaliser le bien-être. Mais l’effet plus manifeste encore du principe sur lequel ces combinaisons sont fondées, c’est d’égaliser la misère; je ne dis pas assez; c’est de faire descendre aux rangs des misérables les familles aisées, et de décimer par la maladie et l’inanition les familles pauvres.

I certainly do not deny that among the innumerable systems that this false principle gives rise to, a great number, the greater number even, originate from benevolent and generous intentions. But what is vicious is the principle itself. The manifest end of each particular plan is to equalize prosperity. But the still more manifest result of the principle on which these plans are founded is to equalize poverty; nay more, the effect is to force the well-to-do families down into the ranks of the poor and to decimate the families of the poor by sickness and starvation.

J’avoue que je suis effrayé pour l’avenir de mon pays, quand je songe à la gravité des difficultés financières que ce dangereux principe vient aggraver encore. 

I confess that I fear for the future of my country when I think of the seriousness of the financial difficulties that this dangerous principle will aggravate still further.

Au 24 février, nous avons trouvé un budget qui dépasse les proportions auxquelles la France peut raisonnablement atteindre; et, en outre, selon le ministre actuel des finances, pour près d’un milliard de dettes immédiatement exigibles. À partir de cette situation, déjà si alarmante, les dépenses ont été toujours grandissant, et les recettes diminuant sans cesse.

On February 24, we found that we had a budget that exceeds the income that France can reasonably attain; and, beyond that, according to the present Minister of Finance, nearly a billion francs worth of debts payable immediately on demand.

Ce n’est pas tout. On a jeté au public, avec une prodigalité sans mesure, deux sortes de promesses. Selon les unes, on va le mettre en possession d’une foule innombrable d’institutions bienfaisantes, mais coûteuses. Selon les autres, on va dégrever tous les impôts. Ainsi, d’une part, on va multiplier les crèches, les salles d’asile, les écoles primaires, les écoles secondaires gratuites, les ateliers de travail, les pensions de retraite de l’industrie. On va indemniser les propriétaires d’esclaves, dédommager les esclaves eux-mêmes; l’État va fonder des institutions de crédit; prêter aux travailleurs des instruments de travail; il double l’armée, réorganise la marine, etc., etc., et d’autre part, il supprime l’impôt du sel, l’octroi et toutes les contributions les plus impopulaires. 

In this situation, already so alarming, the expenses have been continually increasing, and the receipts constantly decreasing. Nor is this all. The public has been deluged, with an unlimited prodigality, by two sorts of promises. According to one, a vast number of charitable, but costly, institutions are to be established at public expense. According to the other, all taxes are going to be reduced. Thus, on the one hand, nurseries, asylums, free primary and secondary schools, workshops, and industrial retirement pensions are going to be multiplied. Slave owners are going to be paid indemnities, and the slaves themselves are to be paid damages; the state is going to found credit institutions, lend to workers the tools of production, double the size of the army, reorganize the navy, etc., etc., and, on the other hand, it will abolish the tax on salt, tolls, and all the most unpopular excises.

Certes, quelque idée qu’on se fasse des ressources de la France, on admettra du moins qu’il faut que ces ressources se développent pour faire face à cette double entreprise si gigantesque et, en apparence, si contradictoire. Certainly, whatever idea one may have of France’s resources, it will at least be admitted that these resources must be developed in order to be adequate for this double enterprise, so gigantic and apparently so contradictory.

Mais voici qu’au milieu de ce mouvement extraordinaire, et qu’on pourrait considérer comme au-dessus des forces humaines, même alors que toutes les énergies du pays seraient dirigées vers le travail productif, un cri s’élève: Le droit de propriété est une création de la loi. En conséquence, le législateur peut rendre à chaque instant, et selon les théories systématiques dont il est imbu, des décrets qui bouleversent toutes les combinaisons de l’industrie. Le travailleur n’est pas propriétaire d’une chose ou d’une valeur parce qu’il l’a créée par le travail, mais parce que la loi d’aujourd’hui la lui garantit. La loi de demain peut retirer cette garantie, et alors la propriété n’est plus légitime.

But here, in the midst of this extraordinary movement, which may be considered as above the power of man to accomplish, at the same time as all the energies of the country are being directed toward productive labor, a cry arises: The right to property is a creation of the law. Consequently, the legislator can promulgate at any time, in accordance with whatever theories he has come to accept, decrees that may upset all the calculations of industry. The worker is not the owner of a thing or of a value because he has created it by his labor, but because today’s law guarantees it. Tomorrow’s law can withdraw this guarantee, and then the ownership is no longer legitimate.

Je le demande, que doit-il arriver? C’est que le capital et le travail s’épouvantent; c’est qu’ils ne puissent plus compter sur l’avenir. Le capital, sous le coup d’une telle doctrine, se cachera, désertera, s’anéantira. Et que deviendront alors les ouvriers, ces ouvriers pour qui vous professez une affection si vive, si sincère, mais si peu éclairée? Seront-ils mieux nourris quand la production agricole sera arrêtée? Seront-ils mieux vêtus quand nul n’osera fonder une fabrique? Seront-ils plus occupés quand les capitaux auront disparu? 

What must be the consequence of all this? Capital and labor will be frightened; they will no longer be able to count on the future. Capital, under the impact of such a doctrine, will hide, flee, be destroyed. And what will become, then, of the workers, those workers for whom you profess an affection so deep and sincere, but so unenlightened? Will they be better fed when agricultural production is stopped? Will they be better dressed when no one dares to build a factory? Will they have more employment when capital will have disappeared?

Et l’impôt, d’où le tirerez-vous? Et les finances, comment se rétabliront-elles? Comment paierez-vous l’armée? Comment acquitterez-vous vos dettes? Avec quel argent prêterez-vous les instruments du travail? Avec quelles ressources soutiendrez-vous ces institutions charitables, si faciles à décréter? And from what source will you derive the taxes? And how will you replenish the treasury? How will you pay the army? How will you meet your debts? With what money will you furnish the tools of production? With what resources will you support these charitable institutions, so easy to establish by decree?

Je me hâte d’abandonner ces tristes considérations. Il me reste à examiner dans ses conséquences le principe opposé à celui qui prévaut aujourd’hui, le principe économiste, le principe qui fait remonter au travail, et non à la loi, le droit de propriété, le principe qui dit: La Propriété existe avant la Loi; la loi n’a pour mission que de faire respecter la propriété partout où elle est, partout où elle se forme, de quelque manière que le travailleur la crée, isolément ou par association, pourvu qu’il respecte le droit d’autrui. 

I hasten to turn aside from these dreary considerations. It remains for me to examine the consequences of the principle opposed to that which prevails today, the economist’s principle, the principle that derives the right to property from labor, and not from the law, the principle which says: Property is prior to law; the sole function of the law is to safeguard the right to property wherever it exists, wherever it is formed, in whatever manner the worker produces it, whether individually or in association, provided that he respects the rights of others. First, whereas the jurists’ principle involves virtual slavery, the economists’ principle implies liberty. Property, the right to enjoy the fruits of one’s labor, the right to work, to develop, to exercise one’s faculties, according to one’s own understanding, without the state intervening otherwise than by its protective action–this is what is meant by liberty. And I still cannot understand why the numerous partisans of the systems opposed to liberty allow the word liberty to remain on the flag of the Republic. To be sure, a few of them have effaced it in order to substitute the word solidarity. They are more honest and more logical. But they should have said communism, and not solidarity; for the solidarity of men’s interests, like property, exists outside the purview of the law.

D’abord, comme le principe des juristes renferme virtuellement l’esclavage, celui des économistes contient la liberté. La propriété, le droit de jouir du fruit de son travail, le droit de travailler, de se développer, d’exercer ses facultés, comme on l’entend, sans que l’État intervienne autrement que par son action protectrice, c’est la liberté. — Et je ne puis encore comprendre pourquoi les nombreux partisans des systèmes opposés laissent subsister sur le drapeau de la République le mot liberté. On dit que quelques-uns d’entre eux l’ont effacé pour y substituer le mot solidarité. Ceux-là sont plus francs et plus conséquents. Seulement, ils auraient dû dire communisme, et non solidarité; car la solidarité des intérêts, comme la propriété, existe en dehors de la loi. Moreover, it implies unity. This we have already seen. If the legislator creates the right to property, there are as many modes of property as there can be errors in the utopians’ heads, that is, an infinite number. If, on the contrary, the right to property is a providential fact, prior to all human legislation, and which it is the function of human legislation to safeguard, there is no place for any other system.

C’est encore la sécurité, et ceci est de toute évidence: qu’il soit bien reconnu, au sein d’un peuple, que chacun doit pourvoir à ses moyens d’existence, mais aussi que chacun a aux fruits de son travail un droit antérieur et supérieur à la loi; que la loi humaine n’a été nécessaire et n’est intervenue que pour garantir à tous la liberté du travail et la propriété de ses fruits; il est bien évident qu’un avenir de sécurité complète s’ouvre devant l’activité humaine. 

Beyond this, there is security; and all evidence clearly indicates that, if people sincerely recognize the obligation of every person to provide his own means of existence, as well as every person’s right to the fruits of his own labor as prior and superior to the law, if human law is needed and intervenes only to guarantee to all the freedom to engage in labor and the ownership of its fruits, then all human industry is assured a future of complete security. here is no longer reason to fear that the legislature may, with one decree after another, stifle effort, upset plans, frustrate foresight. Under the shelter of such security, capital will rapidly be created. The rapid accumulation of capital, in turn, is the sole reason for the increase in the value of labor. The working classes will, then, be well off; they themselves will co-operate to form new capital. They will be better able to rise from the status of wage earners, to invest in business enterprises, to found enterprises of their own, and to regain their dignity.

Enfin, le principe éternel que l’État ne doit pas être producteur, mais procurer la sécurité aux producteurs, entraîne nécessairement l’économie et l’ordre dans les finances publiques; par conséquent, seul il rend possible la bonne assiette et la juste répartition de l’impôt. Finally, the eternal principle that the state should not be a producer, but the provider of security for the producers, necessarily involves economy and order in public finances; consequently, this principle alone renders prosperity possible and a just distribution of taxes.

En effet, l’État, ne l’oublions jamais, n’a pas de ressources qui lui soient propres. Il n’a rien, il ne possède rien qu’il ne le prenne aux travailleurs. Lors donc qu’il s’ingère de tout, il substitue la triste et coûteuse activité de ses agents à l’activité privée. Si, comme aux États-Unis, on en venait à reconnaître que la mission de l’État est de procurer à tous une complète sécurité, cette mission, il pourrait la remplir avec quelques centaines de millions. Grâce à cette économie, combinée avec la prospérité industrielle, il serait enfin possible d’établir l’impôt direct, unique, frappant exclusivement la propriété réalisée de toute nature. Let us never forget that, in fact, the state has no resources of its own. It has nothing, it possesses nothing that it does not take from the workers. When, then, it meddles in everything, it substitutes the deplorable and costly activity of its own agents for private activity. If, as in the United States, it came to be recognized that the function of the state is to provide complete security for all, it could fulfill this function with a few hundred million francs. Thanks to this economy, combined with industrial prosperity, it would finally be possible to impose a single direct tax, levied exclusively on property of all kinds.

Mais, pour cela, il faut attendre que des expériences, peut-être cruelles, aient diminué quelque peu notre foi dans l’État et augmenté notre foi dans l’Humanité. But, for that, we must wait until we have learned by experience –perhaps cruel experience–to trust in the state a little less and in mankind a little more.

Je terminerai par quelques mots sur l’Association du libre-échange. On lui a beaucoup reproché ce titre. Ses adversaires se sont réjouis, ses partisans se sont affligés de ce que les uns et les autres considéraient comme une faute. 

I shall conclude with a few words on the Association for Free Trade. [In 1846, Bastiat helped to organize the first Association for Free Trade in Bordeaux, and soon thereafter he was named secretary of a similar association established in Paris.–TRANSLATOR] It has been very much criticized for having adopted this name. Its adversaries have rejoiced, and its supporters have been distressed, by what both consider as a defect.

Pourquoi semer ainsi l’alarme? disaient ces derniers. Pourquoi inscrire sur votre drapeau un principe? Pourquoi ne pas vous borner à réclamer dans le tarif des douanes ces modifications sages et prudentes que le temps a rendues nécessaires, et dont l’expérience a constaté l’opportunité? 

Why spread alarm in this way?” said its supporters. “Why inscribe a principle on your banner? Why not limit yourself to demanding those wise and prudent changes in the customs duties that time has rendered necessary and experience has shown to be expedient?

Qu’on lise le premier acte émané de notre Association, le programme rédigé dans une séance préparatoire, le 10 mai 1846; on se convaincra que ce fut là notre pensée dominante. 

If our critics will but read the first statement issued by our Association, the program drafted at a preliminary session, May 10, 1846, they will be convinced that this was our dominating idea:

« L’échange est un droit naturel comme la Propriété. Tout citoyen qui a créé ou acquis un produit, doit avoir l’option ou de l’appliquer immédiatement à son usage, ou de le céder à quiconque, sur la surface du globe, consent à lui donner en échange l’objet de ses désirs. Le priver de cette faculté, quand il n’en fait aucun usage contraire à l’ordre public et aux bonnes mœurs, et uniquement pour satisfaire la convenance d’un autre citoyen, c’est légitimer une spoliation, c’est blesser la loi de justice. 

Exchange, like property, is a natural right. Every citizen who has produced or acquired a product should have the option of applying it immediately to his own use or of giving it to whoever on the face of the earth consents to give him in exchange the object of his desires. To deprive him of this faculty, when he has committed no act contrary to public order and good morals, and solely to satisfy the convenience of another citizen, is to legitimize an act of plunder and to violate the law of justice.

Nous placions tellement la question au-dessus des tarifs que nous ajoutions: Les soussignés ne contestent pas à la société le droit d’établir, sur les marchandises qui passent la frontière, des taxes destinées aux dépenses communes, pourvu qu’elles soient déterminées par les besoins du Trésor.

The undersigned do not contest the right of society to levy on the merchandise that crosses its borders taxes reserved for the common expense, provided that they are determined solely by the needs of the public treasury. 

Mais sitôt que la taxe, perdant son caractère fiscal, a pour but de repousser le produit étranger, au détriment du fisc lui-même, afin d’exhausser artificiellement le prix du produit national similaire, et de rançonner ainsi la communauté au profit d’une classe, dès ce moment la Protection, ou plutôt la Spoliation se manifeste, et c’est là le principe que l’Association aspire à ruiner dans les esprits et à effacer complètement de nos lois. 

But as soon as the tax, losing its fiscal character, has for its object the exclusion of a foreign product, to the detriment of the treasury itself, in order to raise artificially the price of a similar domestic product, and to exact tribute from the community for the profit of one class, from that moment protection, or rather plunder, makes its appearance, and this is the principle that the Association seeks to discredit and to efface completely from our laws.

 C’est encore violer les conditions de l’ordre; car quel ordre peut exister au sein d’une société où chaque industrie, aidée en cela par la loi et la force publique, cherche ses succès dans l’oppression de toutes les autres? .

 It is, further, to violate the conditions of public order; for what order can exist in a society in which each industry, aided and abetted by the law and the public police force, seeks its success in the oppression of all the others?

Certes, si nous n’avions poursuivi qu’une modification immédiate des tarifs, si nous avions été, comme on l’a prétendu, les agents de quelques intérêts commerciaux, nous nous serions bien gardés d’inscrire sur notre drapeau un mot qui implique un principe. Croit-on que je n’aie pas pressenti les obstacles que nous susciterait cette déclaration de guerre à l’injustice? Ne savais-je pas très bien qu’en louvoyant, en cachant le but, en voilant la moitié de notre pensée, nous arriverions plus tôt à telle ou telle conquête partielle? Mais en quoi ces triomphes, d’ailleurs éphémères, eussent-ils dégagé et sauvegardé le grand principe de la Propriété, que nous aurions nous-mêmes tenu dans l’ombre et mis hors de cause? 

Certainly, if we had been working only for an immediate reduction in customs duties, if we had been, as has been alleged, the agents of certain commercial interests, we should have been very careful not to inscribe on our banner a word that implies a principle. Is it supposed that I did not foresee the obstacles that this declaration of war against injustice would place in our path? Did I not know very well that by evasive maneuvering, by hiding our aim, by veiling half our thought, we should the sooner achieve such or such a partial victory? But just how would these triumphs, actually ephemeral, have redeemed and safeguarded the great principle of property rights, which in that case we should ourselves have kept in the background and out of the discussion?

Je le répète, nous demandions l’abolition du régime protecteur, non comme une bonne mesure gouvernementale, mais comme une justice, comme la réalisation de la liberté, comme la conséquence rigoureuse d’un droit supérieur à la loi. Ce que nous voulions au fond, nous ne devions pas le dissimuler dans la forme. 

I repeat, we asked for the abolition of the protectionist system, not as a good governmental measure, but as an act of justice, as the realization of liberty, as the strict consequence of a right superior to the law. We should not conceal what we really want under a misleading form of expression.

Le temps approche où l’on reconnaîtra que nous avons eu raison de ne pas consentir à mettre, dans le titre de notre Association, un leurre, un piège, une surprise, une équivoque, mais la franche expression d’un principe éternel d’ordre et de justice, car il n’y a de puissance que dans les principes; eux seuls sont le flambeau des intelligences, le point de ralliement des convictions égarées. 

The time is coming when it will be recognized that we were right not to consent to put into the name of our Association a lure, a trap, a surprise, an equivocation, but rather the frank expression of an eternal principle of order and justice; for there is power only in principles: they alone are a beacon light for men’s minds, a rallying point for convictions gone astray.

Dans ces derniers temps, un tressaillement universel a parcouru, comme un frisson d’effroi, la France toute entière. Au seul mot de communisme, toutes les existences se sont alarmées. En voyant se produire au grand jour et presque officiellement les systèmes les plus étranges, en voyant se succéder des décrets subversifs, qui peuvent être suivis de décrets plus subversifs encore, chacun s’est demandé dans quelle voie nous marchions. Les capitaux se sont effrayés, le crédit a fui, le travail a été suspendu, la scie et le marteau se sont arrêtés au milieu de leur œuvre, comme si un funeste et universel courant électrique eût paralysé tout à coup les intelligences et les bras. Et pourquoi? Parce que le principe de la propriété, déjà compromis essentiellement par le régime protecteur, a éprouvé de nouvelles secousses, conséquences de la première; parce que l’intervention de la Loi en matière d’industrie, et comme moyen de pondérer les valeurs et d’équilibrer les richesses, intervention dont le régime protecteur a été la première manifestation, menace de se manifester sous mille formes connues ou inconnues. Oui, je le dis hautement, ce sont les propriétaires fonciers, ceux que l’on considère comme les propriétaires par excellence, qui ont ébranlé le principe de la propriété, puisqu’ils en ont appelé à la loi pour donner à leurs terres et à leurs produits une valeur factice. Ce sont les capitalistes qui ont suggéré l’idée du nivellement des fortunes par la loi. Le protectionnisme a été l’avant-coureur du communisme; je dis plus, il a été sa première manifestation. Car, que demandent aujourd’hui les classes souffrantes? Elles ne demandent pas autre chose que ce qu’ont demandé et obtenu les capitalistes et les propriétaires fonciers. Elles demandent l’intervention de la loi pour équilibrer, pondérer, égaliser la richesse. Ce qu’ils ont fait par la douane, elles veulent le faire par d’autres institutions; mais le principe est toujours le même, prendre législativement aux uns pour donner aux autres; et certes, puisque c’est vous, propriétaires et capitalistes, qui avez fait admettre ce funeste principe, ne vous récriez donc pas si de plus malheureux que vous en réclament le bénéfice. Ils y ont au moins un titre que vous n’aviez pas.

 In recent times, a universal tremor has spread, like a shiver of fright, through all of France. At the mere mention of the word communism everyone becomes alarmed. Seeing the strangest systems emerge openly and almost officially, witnessing a continual succession of subversive decrees, and fearing that these may be followed by decrees even more subversive, everyone is wondering in what direction we are going. Capital is frightened, credit has taken flight, work has been suspended, the saw and the hammer have stopped in the midst of their labor, as if a disastrous electric current had suddenly paralyzed all men’s minds and hands. And why? Because the right to property, already essentially compromised by the protectionist system, has been subjected to new shocks consequent upon the first one; because the intervention of the law in matters of industry, as a means of stabilizing values and equilibrating incomes, an intervention of which the protectionist system has been the first known manifestation, now threatens to manifest itself in a thousand forms, known or unknown. Yes, I say it openly: it is the landowners, those who are considered property owners par excellence, who have undermined property rights, since they have appealed to the law to give an artificial value to their lands and their products. It is the capitalists who have suggested the idea of equalizing wealth by law. Protectionism has been the forerunner of communism; I say more: it has been its first manifestation. For what do the suffering classes demand today? They ask for nothing else than what the capitalists and landlords have demanded and obtained. They ask for the intervention of the law to achieve balance, equilibrium, equality in the distribution of wealth. What has been done in the first case by means of the tariff, they wish to do by other means, but the principle remains the same: Use the law to take from some to give to others; and certainly since it is you, landowners and capitalists, who have had this disastrous principle accepted, do not complain, then, if people less fortunate than you are claim its benefits. They at least have a claim to it that you do not.

Dans ces derniers temps, un tressaillement universel a parcouru, comme un frisson d’effroi, la France toute entière. Au seul mot de communisme, toutes les existences se sont alarmées. En voyant se produire au grand jour et presque officiellement les systèmes les plus étranges, en voyant se succéder des décrets subversifs, qui peuvent être suivis de décrets plus subversifs encore, chacun s’est demandé dans quelle voie nous marchions. Les capitaux se sont effrayés, le crédit a fui, le travail a été suspendu, la scie et le marteau se sont arrêtés au milieu de leur œuvre, comme si un funeste et universel courant électrique eût paralysé tout à coup les intelligences et les bras. Et pourquoi? Parce que le principe de la propriété, déjà compromis essentiellement par le régime protecteur, a éprouvé de nouvelles secousses, conséquences de la première; parce que l’intervention de la Loi en matière d’industrie, et comme moyen de pondérer les valeurs et d’équilibrer les richesses, intervention dont le régime protecteur a été la première manifestation, menace de se manifester sous mille formes connues ou inconnues. Oui, je le dis hautement, ce sont les propriétaires fonciers, ceux que l’on considère comme les propriétaires par excellence, qui ont ébranlé le principe de la propriété, puisqu’ils en ont appelé à la loi pour donner à leurs terres et à leurs produits une valeur factice. Ce sont les capitalistes qui ont suggéré l’idée du nivellement des fortunes par la loi. Le protectionnisme a été l’avant-coureur du communisme; je dis plus, il a été sa première manifestation. Car, que demandent aujourd’hui les classes souffrantes? Elles ne demandent pas autre chose que ce qu’ont demandé et obtenu les capitalistes et les propriétaires fonciers. Elles demandent l’intervention de la loi pour équilibrer, pondérer, égaliser la richesse. Ce qu’ils ont fait par la douane, elles veulent le faire par d’autres institutions; mais le principe est toujours le même, prendre législativement aux uns pour donner aux autres; et certes, puisque c’est vous, propriétaires et capitalistes, qui avez fait admettre ce funeste principe, ne vous récriez donc pas si de plus malheureux que vous en réclament le bénéfice. Ils y ont au moins un titre que vous n’aviez pas.

Mais on ouvre les yeux enfin, on voit vers quel abîme nous pousse cette première atteinte portée aux conditions essentielles de toute sécurité sociale. N’est-ce pas une terrible leçon, une preuve sensible de cet enchaînement de causes et d’effets, par lequel apparût à la longue la justice des rétributions providentielles, que de voir aujourd’hui les riches s’épouvanter devant l’envahissement d’une fausse doctrine, dont ils ont eux-mêmes posé les bases iniques, et dont ils croyaient faire paisiblement tourner les conséquences à leur seul profit? Oui, prohibitionnistes, vous avez été les promoteurs du communisme. Oui, propriétaires, vous avez détruit dans les esprits la vraie notion de la Propriété.  

But finally people’s eyes are beginning to open, and they see the nature of the abyss toward which we are being driven because of this first violation of the conditions essential to all social stability. Is it not a terrible lesson, a tangible proof of the existence of that chain of causes and effects whereby the justice of providential retribution ultimately becomes apparent, to see the rich terrified today by the inroads made by a false doctrine of which they themselves laid the iniquitous foundations, and whose consequences they believed they could quietly turn to their own profit? Yes, protectionists, you have been the promoters of communism. Yes, property owners, you have destroyed the true idea of property in our minds.

Cette notion, c’est l’Économie politique qui la donne, et vous avez proscrit l’Économie politique, parce que, au nom du droit de propriété, elle combattait vos injustes privilèges. — Et quand elles ont saisi le pouvoir, quelle a été aussi la première pensée de ces écoles modernes qui vous effraient? c’est de supprimer.  l’Économie politique, car la science économique, c’est une protestation perpétuelle contre ce nivellement légal que vous avez recherché et que d’autres recherchent aujourd’hui à votre exemple. Vous avez demandé à la Loi autre chose et plus qu’il ne faut demander à la Loi, autre chose et plus que la Loi ne peut donner. Vous lui avez demandé, non la sécurité (c’eût été votre droit), mais la plus-value de ce qui vous appartient, ce qui ne pouvait vous être accordé sans porter atteinte aux droits d’autrui. Et maintenant, la folie de vos prétentions est devenue la folie universelle. — Et si vous voulez conjurer l’orage qui menace de vous engloutir, il ne vous reste qu’une ressource. Reconnaissez votre erreur; renoncez à vos privilèges; faites rentrer la Loi dans ses attributions; renfermez le Législateur dans son rôle. Vous nous avez délaissés, vous nous avez attaqués, parce que vous ne nous compreniez pas sans doute. À l’aspect de l’abîme que vous avez ouvert de vos propres mains, hâtez-vous de vous rallier à nous, dans notre propagande en faveur du droit de propriété, en donnant, je le répète, à ce mot sa signification la plus large, en y comprenant et les facultés de l’homme et tout ce qu’elles parviennent à produire, qu’il s’agisse de travail ou d’échange! 

It was political economy that gave us this idea, and you have proscribed political economy, because in the name of the right to property it opposes your unjust privileges. And when the adherents of these new schools of thought that frighten you came to power, what was the first thing they tried to do? To suppress political economy, for political economy is a perpetual protest against the legal leveling which you have sought, and which others, following your example, seek today. You have demanded of the law something other and more than should be asked of the law, something other and more than the law can give. You have asked of it, not security (that would have been your right), but a surplus value over and above what belongs to you, which could not be accorded to you without violating the rights of others. And now, the folly of your claims has become a universal folly. And if you wish to ward off the storm that threatens to destroy you, you have only one recourse left. Recognize your error; renounce your privileges; let the law return to its proper sphere, and restrict the legislator to his proper role. You have abandoned us, you have attacked us, because you undoubtedly did not understand us. Now that you perceive the abyss that you have opened with your own hands, hasten to join us in our defense of the right to property by giving to this term its broadest possible meaning and showing that it includes both man’s faculties and all that his faculties can produce, whether by labor or by exchange.

La doctrine que nous défendons excite une certaine défiance, à raison de son extrême simplicité; elle se borne à demander à la loi Sécurité pour tous. On a de la peine à croire que le mécanisme gouvernemental puisse être réduit à ces proportions. De plus, comme cette doctrine renferme la Loi dans les limites de la Justice universelle, on lui reproche d’exclure la Fraternité. L’Économie politique n’accepte pas l’accusation. Ce sera l’objet d’un prochain article. 

The doctrine which we are defending arouses a certain opposition because of its extreme simplicity; it confines itself to demanding of the law security for all. People can scarcely believe that the machinery of government can be reduced to these proportions. Moreover, as this doctrine restricts the law to the limits of universal justice, it is reproached for excluding fraternity. Political economy does not accept this accusation. Article printed in the May 15, 1848, issue of the Journal des économistes. 

Bastiat, the Architect of French Law and Theory.

Bastiat, the Architect of French Law and Theory.

Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite, How the Jews of France gained property through Robespierre’s actions. The French Revolution circa 18th Century.

rightsofmanThe Era of Revolution

In the era of the Revolution the Jews did not receive their equality

French and Jewish authority.

Assembly of French and Jewish authorities in the Palais Nationale 18the century French Revolution.

automatically. The Declaration of the Rights of Man which was voted into law by the National Assembly on Aug. 27, 1789, was interpreted as not including the Jews in the new equality. The issue of Jewish rights was first debated in three sessions, Dec. 21–24, 1789, and even the Comte de *Mirabeau, one of their chief proponents, had to move to table the question, because he saw that there were not enough votes with which to pass a decree of emancipation. A month later, in a very difficult session on Jan. 28, 1790, the “Portuguese,” “Spanish,” and “Avignonese” Jews were given their equality. The main argument, made by Talleyrand, was that these Jews were culturally and socially already not alien.

The issue of the Ashkenazim remained unresolved. It was debated repeatedly in the next two years but a direct vote could never be mustered for their emancipation. It was only in the closing days of the National Assembly, on Sept. 27, 1791, that a decree of complete emancipation was finally passed, on the ground that the Jews had to be given equality in order to complete the Revolution, for it was impossible to have a society in which all men of whatever condition were given equal rights and status, except a relative handful of Jews. Even so, the parliament on the very next day passed a decree of exception under which the debts owed the Jews in eastern France were to be put under special and governmental supervision. This was a sop to anti-Jewish opinion, which had kept complaining of the rapacity of the Jews. The Jews refused to comply with this act, for they said that it was contrary to the logic of a decree of equality. Opinion thus had remained divided even in the last days, when Jews were being given their liberty.

https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0007_0_06791.html

Satyagraha in South Africa. Apartheid not.

s.africas.africacrowdsatyagrahaONE MORAL LAW NOT?

s.africa12