Menelaus, the victor of the Trojan War. Greek Mythology, perhaps though not likely.

The Trojan War.

Menelaus, King of Sparta

Menelaus, King of Sparta and Husband of Helen of Troy.

Trojan Horse, Entry into Troy.

Entry and the Siege of Troy

Actual bust of Helen of Troy. Stunning!!

Actual bust of Helen of Troy. Truly a face that launched a thousand ships!!

Menelaus was the undisputed king of Sparta and married to the beauty Helen. Homer’s Iliad is the most expansive source for Menelaus’s exploits during the Trojan War. In Book 3, Menelaus challenges Paris to a duel for Helen’s return. Menelaus soundly beats Paris, but before he can kill him and claim victory, Aphrodite spirits Paris away inside the walls of Troy. In Book 4, while the Greeks and Trojans squabble over the duel’s winner, Athena inspires the Trojan Pandarus to kill Menelaus with his bow and arrow. Menelaus is wounded in the abdomen, and the fighting resumes. Later, in Book 17, Homer gives Menelaus an extended aristeia as the hero retrieves the corpse of Patroclus from the battlefield.

According to Hyginus, Menelaus killed eight men in the war, and was one of the Greeks hidden inside the Trojan Horse. During the sack of Troy, Menelaus killed Deiphobus, who had married Helen after the death of Paris.

There are four versions of Menelaus’ and Helen’s reunion on the night of the sack of Troy:Angry at Helen, Menelaus looked for and found her. In a fit of rage, he decided to kill her for leaving him for Paris, but when he raised his sword, she started to weep at her former husband’s feet, begging for her life. In a split second, Menelaus’ wrath went away instantly. He took pity on her, and decided to take her back as wife.Menelaus resolved to kill Helen but her striking beauty prompted him to drop his sword and take her back to his ship “to punish her at Sparta”, as he claimed.[7]According to the Bibliotheca, Menelaus raised his sword in front of the temple in the central square of Troy to kill her but his wrath went away when he saw her tearing her clothes in sorrow (to reveal her breasts).A similar version by Stesichorus in “Ilion’s Conquest” narrated that Menelaus surrendered her indeed to his soldiers to stone her to death; however, when she ripped the front of her robes, the Achaean warriors were stunned by her beauty and the stones fell harmlessly from their hands.According to Euripides’ Helen, after Menelaus dies, he is reunited with Helen on the Isle of the Blessed.[8] paradise.

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